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katastrofa
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Re: Grammar Time!

November 5th, 2019, 11:49 pm

 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: Grammar Time!

November 6th, 2019, 9:21 am

Pages 119-152 could come in useful.

I do hope Cyrillic alphabet.

Proof reading as well ...better than Hungarian Phrase Book..
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katastrofa
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Re: Grammar Time!

November 6th, 2019, 6:49 pm

I can't speak for Ukranian women, but my advice is don't pay a Ukrainian woman compliments about her physical appearance. We find it offensive (or at least arrogant).
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: Grammar Time!

November 6th, 2019, 7:00 pm

I can't speak for Ukranian women, but my advice is don't pay a Ukrainian woman compliments about her physical appearance. We find it offensive (or at least arrogant).
Same in the Netherlands. Any compliments are viewed with suspicion. But there are other approaches. Polish women ... don't disparage the Pope! A show-stopper.
Constantinople suited me better.
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Re: Grammar Time!

November 10th, 2019, 1:21 pm

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katastrofa
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Re: Grammar Time!

December 13th, 2019, 2:46 pm

Image
А що з нами стало??
 
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tagoma
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Re: Grammar Time!

December 14th, 2019, 7:38 pm

As a French-native I'm feeling uneasy to admit it, but I got confused by the 'K' word. 
According to corrupted BBG, Argentina raised export tax on a series of agricultural products. BBG articles reads:
"For soybeans and processed soy products, an additional 18% is charged, to which there’s been no change."
What does relate to what in this 3-sectioned sentence? What does it even mean? Have soybeans and soybean products export taxes been raised?

EDIT: changed the weblink
Last edited by tagoma on December 14th, 2019, 8:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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bearish
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Re: Grammar Time!

December 14th, 2019, 8:05 pm

Adding one more sentence, I actually think it's pretty clear: "At the current exchange rate that’s less than 7%. For soybeans and processed soy products, an additional 18% is charged, to which there’s been no change."

To me, this says that there has been no change to the incremental export tax on soybeans and processed soy products, and that the total export tax on them is less than (but probably close to) 25%. One ambiguity is whether the 18% should be interpreted as 18 additional percentage points or an 18% scaling up of the base export tax (to 8.3% or so). A quick internet check confirms that it is the former.  
 
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tagoma
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Re: Grammar Time!

December 14th, 2019, 8:50 pm

Adding one more sentence, I actually think it's pretty clear: "At the current exchange rate that’s less than 7%. For soybeans and processed soy products, an additional 18% is charged, to which there’s been no change."

To me, this says that there has been no change to the incremental export tax on soybeans and processed soy products, and that the total export tax on them is less than (but probably close to) 25%. One ambiguity is whether the 18% should be interpreted as 18 additional percentage points or an 18% scaling up of the base export tax (to 8.3% or so). A quick internet check confirms that it is the former.  
Thank you bearish. The BBG text is confusing to me.
 
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tagoma
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Re: Grammar Time!

December 14th, 2019, 10:49 pm

Adding one more sentence, I actually think it's pretty clear: "At the current exchange rate that’s less than 7%. For soybeans and processed soy products, an additional 18% is charged, to which there’s been no change."

To me, this says that there has been no change to the incremental export tax on soybeans and processed soy products, and that the total export tax on them is less than (but probably close to) 25%. One ambiguity is whether the 18% should be interpreted as 18 additional percentage points or an 18% scaling up of the base export tax (to 8.3% or so). A quick internet check confirms that it is the former.  
Thank you bearish. The BBG text is confusing to me.
If of interest to you, BBG article actually is misleading as new soybean export tax is 30%.
The quality of commodity-related BBG articles has been deteriorating lately. Clickbait, poorly-document and poorly-written. And I'm even not talking about their crappy time series in the terminal (crazy number roundings and unit conversion, errors, missing datapoints, delayed updating). 
While the cat's away...
 
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bearish
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Re: Grammar Time!

December 14th, 2019, 10:53 pm

Interesting. Commodities is the one area of derivatives that I have stayed away from, on account of knowing what I don't know. But I have some inside knowledge of BBG, and find it curious that they are not getting this together. I'm less surprised at the news team than the terminal data team (they are the ones who make the money for Mike). And, you know, he has been back for a few years...
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: Grammar Time!

December 20th, 2019, 10:05 pm

  • Through can be a preposition, an adjective, and an adverb.
  • Through is the only formally accepted spelling of the word.
  • Thru is an alternate spelling that should be used only in informal writing or when referring to drive-throughs.
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tw
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Re: Grammar Time!

January 15th, 2020, 12:54 pm

What is received opinion on these?

tradeable or tradable?
arbitrageable or arbitragable?

One opinion.  Another one.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: Grammar Time!

January 15th, 2020, 3:52 pm

They might be Australian English?
Both options look crude. No true Roman centurian would write it like that.

What about tradible?
edible, reducible etc.

We need to go back to our Latin roots
  • The form -ible has the same senses and pronunciation. The choice between the two is somewhat idiosyncratic, but in general, -ible is used in forms derived from Latin verbs of the second, third, and fourth conjugations, and in a few words whose roots end in a soft c or g, while -able is used in all other such words, particularly those formed from Latin verbs of the first conjugation and those that come from French or from Anglo-Saxon (Old English). Fowler's English Usage recommends using -ible for simplicity's sake in any word whose root ends in a soft c or g to avoid -eable (e.g., *changible rather than changeable), but this recommendation has generally not been followed.
BTW which conjugation is verb 'trade'?

Looks like 3rd conjugation?

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:tradere

trādō
trādis
trādit
trādimus
trāditis
trādunt

on forum, 311 hits tradeable, 484 tradable, tradible null points.
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Every Time We Teach a Child Something, We Keep Him from Inventing It Himself
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bearish
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Re: Grammar Time!

January 15th, 2020, 6:51 pm

I would favor including the "e" in both cases, but am not dogmatic about it. I was involved in a long and painful discussion a few years ago about the proper spelling of the adjective characterizing a bond with an embedded put option. "Putable" or "puttable"? The former invites a mispronunciation along the lines of "reputable" and the latter is what I usually deem my golf ball to be just off the green. I think we settled on the former. 
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