SERVING THE QUANTITATIVE FINANCE COMMUNITY

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 33
 
User avatar
Traden4Alpha
Posts: 23951
Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 2:44 pm

Officer and a Laughing Girl -- Vermeer No digital image can begin to do justice to Vermeer's insanely masterful brush work and colours.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 59665
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 2:51 pm

 
User avatar
trackstar
Topic Author
Posts: 26738
Joined: August 28th, 2008, 1:53 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 3:47 pm

The Noble Deed of Scipio - Nicholas Poussin, 1640
Last edited by trackstar on January 25th, 2009, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
dibble
Posts: 727
Joined: October 2nd, 2006, 5:19 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 5:24 pm

-- Constable was the man .. as was Turner.IMHO Constable cannot clean Turners brushes, but then again very few canNobody else was doing work like this in 1844
 
User avatar
dibble
Posts: 727
Joined: October 2nd, 2006, 5:19 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 5:25 pm

Or like this in 1840
 
User avatar
Fermion
Posts: 4486
Joined: November 14th, 2002, 8:50 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 6:55 pm

Yep! Turner was the supreme impressionist. He makes Renoir, Monet and company look like Canaletto. (Just thought I'd stir things up a little! )
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 59665
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 7:12 pm

what about this Fermion (more stirring!)
 
User avatar
trackstar
Topic Author
Posts: 26738
Joined: August 28th, 2008, 1:53 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 7:21 pm

Fermi-shroom, Are you criticizing my selection of Turner's Bridge of Sighs, perchance?Here is a note from the Tate about it:"This was Turner’s first view in oils of the city of Venice. He exhibited it at the Royal Academy in 1833, more than a decade after he had been in Venice. The painting is less a response to the city itself, than an act of homage to the greatest painter of Venice, Antonio Canaletto, who had lived in the early part of the previous century. Turner in fact shows Canaletto in the left foreground, working at an easel."If you have tired of the Middle East and are looking for a new aesthetic in war, you have come to the right place.
Last edited by trackstar on January 25th, 2009, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Fermion
Posts: 4486
Joined: November 14th, 2002, 8:50 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 7:36 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: mackbarFermion-shroom, Are you criticising my selection of Turner's Bridge of Sighs, perchance?Absolutely not! Just look at Canaletto's paintings of Venice and you'll see what I mean. His forte was extremely detailed attempts at trying to create a photographic image before photography was invented, yet failing in some of the most primitive ways -- he was hopeless at painting water which is a definite handicap when it comes to Venice!! QuoteIf you have tired of the Middle East and are looking for a new aesthetic in war, you have come to the right place.Tee-hee! I was hoping for a war with fans of French impressionism.....Just joking Cuch. But do you notice the difference between your offering and the Turners? It's much more careful in delineating the different parts of the picture with careful edges. Turner didn't care about such things. He just wanted the impression! That was everything to him!Ps. To all the real art afficcionados here. I really know nothing about art. I just shoot my mouth off about what I see.
Last edited by Fermion on January 25th, 2009, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
trackstar
Topic Author
Posts: 26738
Joined: August 28th, 2008, 1:53 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 7:48 pm

Excellent! If you have time to note the artist's name, if not the title, that will help the audience follow along.
Last edited by trackstar on January 25th, 2009, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Traden4Alpha
Posts: 23951
Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 8:00 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: mackbarSuprematicist Composition: White on White, Kasimir Malevich 1918T4A: people might question these shapes too!minimalism!the originator? Donald Judd ?What is fascinating about minimalism is that it forces the viewer to bring more to the piece than does the artist. And in making the viewer think, the artist has fulfilled one of the goals of art in a way that more literal, maximalist art does not. Sometimes less is more!That said, I really prefer something with more intentional/semantic detail than most minimalists muster.
Last edited by Traden4Alpha on January 25th, 2009, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 59665
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 8:06 pm

QuoteJust joking Cuch. But do you notice the difference between your offering and the Turners? It's much more careful in delineating the different parts of the picture with careful edges. Turner didn't care about such things. He just wanted the impression! That was everything to him!Yes, that's what I wanted to say. The contours are more delineated. You are so eloquent.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 59665
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 8:13 pm

Mondriaan
 
User avatar
trackstar
Topic Author
Posts: 26738
Joined: August 28th, 2008, 1:53 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 10:12 pm

Open Window, Collioure - Henri Matisse, 1905
Last edited by trackstar on January 25th, 2009, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
trackstar
Topic Author
Posts: 26738
Joined: August 28th, 2008, 1:53 pm

The Black Cube - Art Gallery

January 26th, 2009, 10:14 pm

Fountain - "R. Mutt" Marcel Duchamp, 1917
ABOUT WILMOTT

PW by JB

Wilmott.com has been "Serving the Quantitative Finance Community" since 2001. Continued...


Twitter LinkedIn Instagram

JOBS BOARD

JOBS BOARD

Looking for a quant job, risk, algo trading,...? Browse jobs here...


GZIP: On