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Cuchulainn
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February 18th, 2015, 8:37 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
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Traden4Alpha
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February 18th, 2015, 2:53 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.
 
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Cuchulainn
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February 18th, 2015, 3:00 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate and katas:-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on February 17th, 2015, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
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Traden4Alpha
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February 18th, 2015, 3:25 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate :-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.It's easy to forget that for most of human history, life was an intensely physical process. The domestication of draft animals occurred fairly late in human evolution and age of mechanized power is but an eye blink in the era of humanity. Survival depended on physical strength and endurance.Some people still retain some innate internal drive toward intensive physical activity and are attracted to climbing mountains or running marathons. It may not be strictly rational in the context of the modern world, but then no personal or spectator sport is. Think of it as legacy software in an OS written 50,000 years ago.
 
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exneratunrisk
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February 18th, 2015, 7:04 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate and katas:-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.Risk optimization: go high, fast, long---enough to have fun, but not that high, fast, long---to ger severely hurt---risk optimization needs routine, but routine is boring?
 
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Cuchulainn
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February 18th, 2015, 7:20 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate and katas:-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.Risk optimization: go high, fast, long---enough to have fun, but not that high, fast, long---to ger severely hurt---risk optimization needs routine, but routine is boring?Steepest ascent/descent, local or global maximum? or
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
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tagoma
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February 18th, 2015, 7:37 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate :-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.It's easy to forget that for most of human history, life was an intensely physical process. The domestication of draft animals occurred fairly late in human evolution and age of mechanized power is but an eye blink in the era of humanity. Survival depended on physical strength and endurance.Some people still retain some innate internal drive toward intensive physical activity and are attracted to climbing mountains or running marathons. It may not be strictly rational in the context of the modern world, but then no personal or spectator sport is. Think of it as legacy software in an OS written 50,000 years ago.RIP. Why is it in the news?
 
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Cuchulainn
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February 18th, 2015, 7:42 pm

I blame Wordsworth, Muir and those 19th century poets for the sudden interest in hill climbing.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on February 17th, 2015, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
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http://www.datasim.nl
 
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daveangel
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February 18th, 2015, 7:47 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnI blame Wordsworth, Muir and those 19th century poets for the sudden interest in hill climbing. may they all RIP
knowledge comes, wisdom lingers
 
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daveangel
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February 18th, 2015, 7:48 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: tagomaWhy is it in the news?you should put that in the stupid question of the day thread
knowledge comes, wisdom lingers
 
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Traden4Alpha
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February 19th, 2015, 12:02 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate and katas:-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.Risk optimization: go high, fast, long---enough to have fun, but not that high, fast, long---to ger severely hurt---risk optimization needs routine, but routine is boring?Steepest ascent/descent, local or global maximum? orRisk optimization isn't easy because:1) the risk of injury or death is non-zero and generally small for almost all activities (death is a rare but omnipresent threat)2) the risk of injury or death for a given activity varies between people as a function of health, preparation, and equipment (your milage may vary)3) the risk of injury or death is not known, especially at the level of individuals (people can easily conclude that something is not risky)Ergo, healthy people with experience at "dangerous activity X" are likely to estimate the chance of death as low, repeat said activity under increasingly extreme conditions, and die from said activity.
 
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DevonFangs
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February 19th, 2015, 7:56 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate :-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.It's easy to forget that for most of human history, life was an intensely physical process. The domestication of draft animals occurred fairly late in human evolution and age of mechanized power is but an eye blink in the era of humanity. Survival depended on physical strength and endurance.Some people still retain some innate internal drive toward intensive physical activity and are attracted to climbing mountains or running marathons. It may not be strictly rational in the context of the modern world, but then no personal or spectator sport is. Think of it as legacy software in an OS written 50,000 years ago.Hmm, but say I have some innate internal drive toward pot, which is not strictly rational but you know, I have a pineal gland which is legacy. I don't think my wife and family would take it too well if I just sat on the couch all day smoking.
 
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Cuchulainn
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February 19th, 2015, 8:18 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: DevonFangsQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperNYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies of exposure during solo hike in New Hampshire mountainsKate Matrosova, 32anyone here know her ?Seemed like quite an irresponsible thing to do. But RIP nonetheless.I don't understand why people do that crazy stuff.I know a number of people who do things like this and have seen four categories of reasons. First, they see it as a supreme mental and physical challenge that gets them out of their usual workaday lives in which they have no way to combat stress. Second, some of them are also adrenaline junkies -- they only feel alive when they are one false step away from death. Third, some of them are still young enough and fit enough to feel they are immortal and can overcome anything. Finally, in their defense, I must admit that these wild natural landscapes are amazingly beautiful.1) not a good reason IMO.2) like an accountant who wants to be a lion-tamer.3) I used to love judo competitions, the adreline is sky high. Now I do karate :-)4) But not alone in the middle of nowhere at minus 30. It's not just yourself. Reminds of the Irish CEO of intrade.com John Delaney who lost his life on Everest. A wife + two kids I believe.It's easy to forget that for most of human history, life was an intensely physical process. The domestication of draft animals occurred fairly late in human evolution and age of mechanized power is but an eye blink in the era of humanity. Survival depended on physical strength and endurance.Some people still retain some innate internal drive toward intensive physical activity and are attracted to climbing mountains or running marathons. It may not be strictly rational in the context of the modern world, but then no personal or spectator sport is. Think of it as legacy software in an OS written 50,000 years ago.Hmm, but say I have some innate internal drive toward pot, which is not strictly rational but you know, I have a pineal gland which is legacy. I don't think my wife and family would take it too well if I just sat on the couch all day smoking.I thought that's what you did all day. Apologies. Just kidding.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on February 18th, 2015, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
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tagoma
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February 19th, 2015, 8:42 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: tagomaWhy is it in the news?you should put that in the stupid question of the day threadI mean why "NYC financial analyst, married to JP Morgan exec, dies"Instead of woman 32 dies"?
 
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trackstar
Posts: 27499
Joined: August 28th, 2008, 1:53 pm

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February 19th, 2015, 8:47 am

Here is an article with a little more detail from The Boston GlobeThe weather is absolutely ferocious up there this time of year and can change for the worse very quickly. It seems that she hiked from about 5 am to 3:30 pm and then she set off the beacon. By that time, winds were topping 107 MPH, white out conditions.So sad that the rescue team could not find her that day. The beacon signals were scattered (perhaps disoriented and walking in circles by then) the team managed to make the recovery the next day.You can find a few thoughtful (and of course some malicious) comments at the end of the article from hikers and people who know the Presidential Range.RIP
Last edited by trackstar on February 18th, 2015, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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