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Cuchulainn
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

February 15th, 2012, 5:59 pm

At the moment I use Excel but it too limited for 3d, 2d.Any ideas?Am thinking of OpenVRMLUsed VRML during the VR 90's hype (gloves, headsets etc.) but this might be a comeback?
Last edited by Cuchulainn on February 14th, 2012, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Alan
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

February 15th, 2012, 6:30 pm

Well Mathematica graphics arewonderful. I wouldn't buy it just for that but, for example, it will make the Heston pde error analysis a piece ofcake, as the exact soln is only 20 lines or so of code, which I will be happy to send along. Data import is straightforward
Last edited by Alan on February 14th, 2012, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Polter
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

February 15th, 2012, 6:54 pm

 
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tagoma
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

February 15th, 2012, 6:58 pm

do you kwow MathGL?
 
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ExSan
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

February 15th, 2012, 7:29 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: edouarddo you kwow MathGL?From Source ForgeMathGLA free cross-platform library of fast C++ routines for the plotting of up to 3-ranged data. It can export to bitmap and vector EPS/SVG files. There are window interfaces (GLUT/FLTK/Qt) and console tools. MathGL can be used from C/Fortran/Python/Octav371 weekly downloadsgnuplot developmentFamous scientific plotting package.9,109 weekly downloadsFamous scientific plotting package.
 
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ExSan
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

March 15th, 2012, 8:04 pm

QuoteOctave's plotting capabilities are based on gnuplot.ref
 
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Polter
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

March 15th, 2012, 8:30 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: ExSan QuoteOctave's plotting capabilities are based on gnuplot.refQuoteEarlier versions of Octave provided plotting through the use of gnuplot. This capability is still available. But, a newer plotting capability is provided by access to OpenGL. Which plotting system is used is controlled by the graphics_toolkit function. (See Graphics Toolkits.)The function call graphics_toolkit ("fltk") selects the FLTK/OpenGL system, and graphics_toolkit ("gnuplot") selects the gnuplot system. The two systems may be used selectively through the use of the graphics_toolkit property of the graphics handle for each figure. http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/doc/ ... ottingFLTK is minimalistic (a big plus in this context, IMHO) and pretty simple to work with, see: http://www.wilmott.com/messageview.cfm? ... E=2#477172.
 
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ExSan
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

April 5th, 2012, 11:29 am

Software for Physics Diagrams
 
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Cuchulainn
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

April 6th, 2012, 6:21 am

Matlab has a nice utility called 'Heat map' to display data. Is there something equivalent in C++, possibly 'hidden' in a C++ library?
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Polter
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

April 6th, 2012, 9:16 am

Cuch, one of those perhaps (click on a figure to see the relevant code sample): http://mathgl.sourceforge.net/en/2d_plots.html
 
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ExSan
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

April 7th, 2012, 10:04 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: PolterCuch, one of those perhaps (click on a figure to see the relevant code sample): http://mathgl.sourceforge.net/en/2d_plo ... lterMathGL looks interestingwhat are the advantages of MathGL over GNuplot ? do you know if there is any comparison chart ?
 
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Polter
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

April 7th, 2012, 2:35 pm

ExSan: I think they're for different kinds of applications -- MathGL is a library for interactive plotting (interactive from the point of the program that the library is linked to) -- i.e., you can make and control the plot as the data gets produced by the program (an on-line plotting, in a sense). Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the primary application of Gnuplot is off-line plotting, i.e., it takes a pre-generated data file as an input and produces a figure as an output? Instead, a library (like MathGL, but can be any other) shares the data with the process directly via sharing the same memory.// The best you can do is to emulate this behavior (on-line plotting) in Gnuplot would be via piping commands, e.g. http://www.gnuplot.info/faq/faq.html#SE ... 0000000000 -- but I imagine using this for (soft) real-time graphics would be abysmally slow (possibly why Octave is switching to OpenGL/FLTK). What is interesting and would allow Gnuplot to be used for the on-line plotting is the modification by John Campbell mentioned in the above-mentioned link -- but it seems to be abandoned.Read the interview, it's not bad as an intro: http://www.floss4science.com/interview-mathgl/
Last edited by Polter on April 6th, 2012, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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ExSan
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Visualisation of Data in qfcl

April 7th, 2012, 10:58 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: PolterExSan: I think they're for different kinds of applications -- MathGL is a library for interactive plotting (interactive from the point of the program that the library is linked to) -- i.e., you can make and control the plot as the data gets produced by the program (an on-line plotting, in a sense). Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the primary application of Gnuplot is off-line plotting, i.e., it takes a pre-generated data file as an input and produces a figure as an output? Instead, a library (like MathGL, but can be any other) shares the data with the process directly via sharing the same memory.// The best you can do is to emulate this behavior (on-line plotting) in Gnuplot would be via piping commands, e.g. http://www.gnuplot.info/faq/faq.html#SE ... 0000000000 -- but I imagine using this for (soft) real-time graphics would be abysmally slow (possibly why Octave is switching to OpenGL/FLTK). What is interesting and would allow Gnuplot to be used for the on-line plotting is the modification by John Campbell mentioned in the above-mentioned link -- but it seems to be abandoned.Read the interview, it's not bad as an intro: http://www.floss4science.com/interview-mathgl/Indeed previuos versions of Gnuplot need data previously generated ie. "off line ploting". Current version of Gnuplot 4.5 allows "piping comands". I have tested this and the result is satisfactory. this is when you are in a windows environment. In this context Linux +Gnuplot + C/C++ is much more powerful, I have seen some examples
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