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madmax
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June 22nd, 2005, 12:00 pm

I am interested in installing Linux as a primary boot partition.Which one would you recommend ?How good is it when it comes to protecting from spyware, viruses and other shit ?Thanks
 
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gc
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June 22nd, 2005, 12:18 pm

I tried RedHat, Slackware and Debian. My preference is for Debian. RedHat is great for simplicity of installation and it is under all points of view a good installation. Slackware used to be "the distribution" in the early days, but I tried it a couple of years ago, but it failed to impress me.Out of the three, Debian is my preferred one. It's a bit trickier to install and my suggestion would be to install a first time maybe with just two partitions (/ and swap), play with it for a month until you are confortable with it, and then zap your hard disk and start again from start, picking the packages you like, partitioning your disk in optimal ways, etc. etc... The reason why I like Debian above the others I've tried is the software packaging tool (apt) that they use. Once the system is installed, you need to type two commands to keep it always up to date, and so far it never messed up with the "packages database" or others..In general, don't worry too much about which distribution: they all tend to be quite good. I'm curious to see what the others say: the choice of bistro is very subjective, and my experience with RedHat are now about five years old, so that distribution could have improved greately since.
Last edited by gc on June 21st, 2005, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Marine
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Joined: July 17th, 2003, 7:56 am

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June 22nd, 2005, 2:41 pm

I like RedHat.
 
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linuxuser99
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June 22nd, 2005, 3:43 pm

My vote is for suse.Has KDE not Gnome as the default interface manager. Ergonomically cleaner, performs better and if you ever do end up developing for it a whole lot easier.Can run on a less resource intensive machine - stuff which throws up an exception under Redhat 3 as beign too weedy works just fine under Suse 9.x (I blame Gnome for this)With the pro edition I have had better success getting the packages which come with the install to actually work. Had some serious weird stuff with Redhat in the past regarding this.Out of the box you get a better selection of development tools than RedhatBut whichever one you choose (personally I would stick with one of Redhat, Suse or Mandrake) you will get better virus protection, no spyware and a shed load of dev tools.
 
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tristanreid
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Joined: May 12th, 2004, 6:58 pm

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June 23rd, 2005, 4:22 am

I'm also a redhat fan, but haven't used it in the past year, so I don't know what the very latest is like. The KDE office tools were really cool. The formula editor for the excel-equivalent was really good (KCalc, i think it was called?)Anyway, good luck, post back your decision-t.
 
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adas
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June 23rd, 2005, 4:28 am

I'm going to second SusE, though I've only been using it for 3 months. My previous experience was with Mandrake, which I didn't find user-friendly at all. I was weaned on windows since my first computer, and I'm a bit of a wuss when it comes to experimenting with different O/S. As linuxuser mentioned the interface is a lot cleaner (even with multiple desktops) . The dev tools are also a plus, as well as (and don't knock this) a helpful peer support community.
 
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linuxuser99
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June 23rd, 2005, 7:10 am

OK - so far we all seem to be saying that KDE is the way to go when you come to install the interface - irrespective of which distro you use. For some of this this is not the default so yu will need to check on install.
 
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tristanreid
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June 23rd, 2005, 1:24 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: adasI'm going to second SusE, though I've only been using it for 3 months. My previous experience was with Mandrake, which I didn't find user-friendly at all. I was weaned on windows since my first computer, and I'm a bit of a wuss when it comes to experimenting with different O/S. As linuxuser mentioned the interface is a lot cleaner (even with multiple desktops) . The dev tools are also a plus, as well as (and don't knock this) a helpful peer support community.My vote for Red Hat is not a vote against any of these systems, as I haven't used them. Anyone who has used more than one distro has far more knowledge to share than my humble self.In any case, one thing that I liked about Red Hat was that starting with version 7 the install automated all the partitioning, so you don't have to fool around with PQMagic like the old days. It's even smart enough to detect other OSs and put them in a boot menu for you. The other distros probably do the same, I'm just saying you probably don't need 3rd party software anymore.-t.
 
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linuxuser99
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June 24th, 2005, 7:20 am

>> In any case, one thing that I liked about Red Hat was that starting with version 7 the install automated all the partitioning, so you don't have to fool around with PQMagic like the old days. It's even smart enough to detect other OSs and put them in a boot menu for you. The other distros probably do the same, I'm just saying you probably don't need 3rd party software anymore.Be VERY carefull with this. There is an interaction with some versions of the kernal and the parted tool used by the majority of distributions to repartition your disk that can end up with you hosing you NT partition. While you can get it back it's a lot of effort and nasty. Check on the distributers website for info on this before you try - there are still CD's out there that will break your machine (suse 9.2, Redhat 3, Mandrake 9 all do this on some machines) unless you d/l the correct patch before you start.
 
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Tomfr
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Joined: January 25th, 2003, 5:18 pm

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June 25th, 2005, 7:25 pm

Debian, no doubt. Apt-get is just the best invention since mouse. Still, sometimes tricky to install on certain configurations (especially laptops). Installing with the Net install and an Ethernet connection takes no more than 40 minutes.
 
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youyn
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Joined: June 4th, 2004, 8:28 pm

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July 12th, 2005, 12:47 am

I recommend SUSE if you want to use Linux as a develpment platform as well as an entertaining environment.I installed RedHat/Federa before and after installation I spend several hours to get it ready to use. For SUSE, once you installed it, it seems that everything is ready: internet, multimedia, development tools and etc.
 
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alohashirt
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Joined: July 14th, 2002, 3:00 am

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July 13th, 2005, 4:52 am

I've bopunced betweenfrom Slackware-->Redhat-->Mandrake-->Debian-->Suse-->RedhatFor a while my approach was every six months buy whatever distro has teh cheapest CDs on EBay.Then I went into the Apple Store in Soho (NYC) spent an hour banging on a Powerbook and had to have one.I have't touched Linux or Windows in a year at home.Mac OSX ~ Linux + decent GUI + great phytsical design + cultlike devotees
 
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madmax
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Joined: October 31st, 2003, 9:56 am

Advice on Linux

July 30th, 2005, 2:23 pm

thanks guys. I finally went for Suse Pro 9.3. I couldn't believe how easy it was to install.I like it, I might try other distributions later. For now I am just discovering around what this beauty has to offer.what are your preferred C++ environments and compilers under Linux. I need something as close as possible to the standard, and able to cope properly with a large amount of templates.Thanks for all the advices.
 
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nd
Posts: 56
Joined: September 3rd, 2004, 6:49 pm

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July 31st, 2005, 11:19 pm

for c++ I'd use gcc 4.01. *nix environments are pretty bareboned comparedthe MS -- emacs or some wyswig thing to edit the text and a command line compiler.nehal
 
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fmoussaoui
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Joined: June 16th, 2005, 11:20 am

Advice on Linux

August 8th, 2005, 3:21 pm

You have a choice between several compilers. The "natural" one is gnu compilers.It's versioned now at 4.0 but you have to be careful. Some programs don't compilewith this version and you have to downgrade to 3.3.4 or something like that.You can also download intel compiler for c++. They just relase the 9.0 version.It's free if not used for commercial purposes.There is also IBM compiler xlc and Portland Group compiler pgCC.Farid.
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