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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

September 13th, 2023, 5:02 pm

FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

No ;)
ah go on.
 
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Alan
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

September 16th, 2023, 3:45 pm

Here was Software in 1956 -- on Altair IV:
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

September 18th, 2023, 2:43 pm

Back to the Future of AI.
More Kool Aid

MORE HUMAN THAN EVER, COMPUTER IS LEARNING TO LEARN
https://www.nytimes.com/1987/09/15/scie ... learn.html
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

September 18th, 2023, 6:18 pm

About the Archive
This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.
Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to work to improve these archived versions.
COMPUTER scientists, taking clues from how the brain works, are developing new kinds of computers that seem to have the uncanny ability to learn by themselves.
 
The new systems offer hope of being able to perform tasks such as recognizing objects and understanding speech that have so far stymied conventional computers. Moreover, with the ability to learn by themselves, such machines would not require the laborious programming of rules and procedures that is now required to allow computers to work.
 
The new computers are called neural networks because they contain units that function roughly like the intricate network of neurons in the brain. Early experimental systems, some of them eerily human-like, are inspiring predictions of amazing advances.
 
''I'm convinced that this will be the next large-scale computer revolution,'' said Pentti Kanerva of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science in Mountain View, Calif., run by a consortium of universities. But he and other experts note that the technology is still in its infancy and there are many obstacles to surmount.
 
Among the recent developments are these:
 
* At Johns Hopkins University Terrence Sejnowski developed a program that teaches itself to read out loud. The system is given no rules about how letters are to be pronounced; its errors are merely corrected. At first, the talk is mere gibberish. After a while it begins to utter some baby-like sounds as it learns to distinguish between consonants and vowels. After a night of computing, it reads with few mistakes.
 
* At Avco Financial Services in Irvine, Calif. a neural network learned how to evaluate loan applications after being fed data on 10,000 past loans. One test showed that had the neural system been used in place of the company's existing computerized evaluation system, it would have increased profits 27 percent.
 
* At Los Alamos National Laboratory, researchers used a neural network to predict whether particular DNA sequences represented genetic codes for the manufacture of proteins. The network seemed to work with greater than 80 percent accuracy, better than conventional statistical techniques.
 
In each of these cases, a computer was ''trained'' with a set of tasks or problems and a set of correct answers. As it completed each task, it compared its results with the correct answers. When it was wrong, it altered its own program and tried again. Gradually, it ''learned'' the right approach.
 
Up to a point, the more the computer is ''trained'' the more accurate it gets. But no one can tell at the outset how long the training may take.
 
Lured by the promise of this technology, universities and electronics companies like TRW, I.B.M. and A.T.&T. are pursuing work on such computer systems. And more than two dozen small neural network companies have been formed, mainly in the last two years, according to Intelligence, a New York newsletter that follows the field.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

September 19th, 2023, 10:24 am

Electronic 'Brain' Teaches Itself

July 13, 1958

https://www.nytimes.com/1958/07/13/arch ... tself.html
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

September 22nd, 2023, 10:15 pm

Productivity experts have long emphasized system thinking and processes, strategies that have supported improvements for at least 100 years giving us Henry Ford’s assembly line, JIT manufacturing, and process re-engineering. But one expert says there is too much emphasis today on tasks, such as mail and writing reports: “Today’s companies buy apps to complete tasks or make groups of tasks easier. But the tasks are not isolated; assembled together they make up processes, which make up businesses. We’re all buying apps for tasks, but is anyone thinking about how they affect the whole? To understand how the tasks fit into the big picture, we need to apply systems thinking.“
 
These recent trends suggest that AI will be much harder to implement than previous information technologies. As the New York Times says: “The AI revolution is coming, but not as fast as some people think.”
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

January 7th, 2024, 4:20 pm

U.K. Police Investigate ‘Potential Fraud Offenses’ in Post Office Scandal

https://time.com/6552764/uk-post-office ... ial-fraud/

Japanese tech company Fujitsu Services developed and began operating the Horizon IT financial software services for the Post Office in 1999. Employees said they reported issues with the software from the start, but claimed the Post Office brushed off their concerns or said the issues were the fault of the individual branch managers.

CCRC, which reviewed the wrongful convictions, said that “Horizon appeared to have significant bugs which could cause the system to misreport, sometimes involving substantial sums of money which sub-postmasters found difficult to challenge as they were unable to access information about the software to do so.”


Since the scandal, the government extended its contract for Horizon with Fujitsu.
 
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jasonbell
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

January 10th, 2024, 10:25 am

I should write a technical novella for programmers: "Float64 is Not Money: Be Careful"
Twitter: @jasonbelldata
Author of Machine Learning: Hands on for Developers and Technical Professionals (Wiley).
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

January 22nd, 2024, 3:55 pm

Image
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

January 24th, 2024, 8:23 am

24 January 1984. 
After Apple II (great machine) I lost interest in Mac..
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

February 2nd, 2024, 11:56 pm

Image
 
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bearish
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

February 3rd, 2024, 7:04 pm

She’s cute
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

February 4th, 2024, 10:45 am

The photo is at Mathematisch Centrum, Amsterdam 1954.
In the middle is Edsger Dijkstra, a titan of Computer Science and to his left his fiancée Ria Debets.

Anecdotallly, he discovered the Shortest Path Algorithm when drinking coffee at a nearby cafe with her.

Dijkstra left for Austin, TX because he could not stand the dumbing down of CS education in the Netherlands.

At Amsterdam CWI, the first Dijkstra Fellowship was awarded to Guido van Rossum, the inventor of Python.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

February 20th, 2024, 10:44 am

Well, there you have it folks, 44% believe std::string was created in 1992.

Predicting the future is difficult, predicting the past even more so.
 
leptoq
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

February 21st, 2024, 9:45 pm

Few data scientists at work claim that Julia is going to replace Python (soon :))
I briefly looked at Julia docs and didn't like it, so I can't see why it will happen. I'm curious if anybody here uses Julia.