SERVING THE QUANTITATIVE FINANCE COMMUNITY

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 10
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

September 1st, 2007, 8:37 am

QuoteHow much of the Viconian Cycle analysis is the equivalent to Elliot Waves, Gann Angles, and Fibonacci numbers??? Can we ever know?To give you a technical answer, Elliott has a wavelength of 50 years, while the wavelength of Vico waves is much longer.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

September 8th, 2007, 10:56 am

QuoteThe view of history propounded in this text is very strongly influenced by Giambattista Vico, and the metaphysics of Giordano Bruno of Nola are important to the interplay of the "characters". Vico propounded a cyclical view of history, in which civilisation rose from chaos, passed through theocratic, aristocratic, and democratic phases, and then lapsed back into chaos. The most obvious example of the influence of Vico's cyclical theory of history is to be found in the opening and closing words of the book. Finnegans Wake opens with the words 'riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.' ('vicus' is a pun on Vico) and ends 'A way a lone a last a loved a long the'. In other words, the book ends with the beginning of a sentence and begins with the end of the same sentence, turning the book into one great cycle. Indeed, Joyce said that the ideal reader of the Wake would suffer from "ideal insomnia"[32] and, on completing the book, would turn to page one and start again, and so on in an endless cycle of reading.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on September 7th, 2007, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

October 24th, 2007, 6:12 pm

The Wake in Sounds and PIctures
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

April 1st, 2008, 9:10 pm

The Hunting of the Quark... (not to be confused with Kwok)QuoteThree quarks for Muster Mark! 2 Sure he hasn't got much of a bark 3 And sure any he has it's all beside the mark. 4 But O, Wreneagle Almighty, wouldn't un be a sky of a lark 5 To see that old buzzard whooping about for uns shirt in the dark 6 And he hunting round for uns speckled trousers around by Palmer- 7 stown Park? 8 Hohohoho, moulty Mark! 9 You're the rummest old rooster ever flopped out of a Noah's ark 10 And you think you're cock of the wark. 11 Fowls, up! Tristy's the spry young spark 12 That'll tread her and wed her and bed her and red her 13 Without ever winking the tail of a feather 14 And that's how that chap's going to make his money and mark! QuoteGell-Mann's own explanation:[8][9]In 1963, when I assigned the name "quark" to the fundamental constituents of the nucleon, I had the sound first, without the spelling, which could have been "kwork". Then, in one of my occasional perusals of Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce, I came across the word "quark" in the phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark". Since "quark" (meaning, for one thing, the cry of the gull) was clearly intended to rhyme with "Mark," as well as "bark" and other such words, I had to find an excuse to pronounce it as "kwork". But the book represents the dream of a publican named Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker. Words in the text are typically drawn from several sources at once, like the "portmanteau" words in "Through the Looking Glass". From time to time, phrases occur in the book that are partially determined by calls for drinks at the bar. I argued, therefore, that perhaps one of the multiple sources of the cry "Three quarks for Muster Mark" might be "Three quarts for Mister Mark," in which case the pronunciation "kwork" would not be totally unjustified. In any case, the number three fitted perfectly the way quarks occur in nature. The phrase "three quarks" is a particularly good fit (as mentioned in the above quote), as at the time, there were only three known quarks, and since quarks appear in groups of three in baryons.In Joyce's use, it is seabirds giving "three quarks", akin to three cheers, "quark" having a meaning of the cry of a gull (probably onomatopoeia, like "quack" for ducks). The word is also a pun on the relationship between Munster and its provincial capital, Cork
Last edited by Cuchulainn on March 31st, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
TraderJoe
Posts: 11048
Joined: February 1st, 2005, 11:21 pm

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

April 1st, 2008, 11:58 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnThe Hunting of the Quark... (not to be confused with Kwok)QuoteThree quarks for Muster Mark! 2 Sure he hasn't got much of a bark 3 And sure any he has it's all beside the mark. 4 But O, Wreneagle Almighty, wouldn't un be a sky of a lark 5 To see that old buzzard whooping about for uns shirt in the dark 6 And he hunting round for uns speckled trousers around by Palmer- 7 stown Park? 8 Hohohoho, moulty Mark! 9 You're the rummest old rooster ever flopped out of a Noah's ark 10 And you think you're cock of the wark. 11 Fowls, up! Tristy's the spry young spark 12 That'll tread her and wed her and bed her and red her 13 Without ever winking the tail of a feather 14 And that's how that chap's going to make his money and mark! QuoteGell-Mann's own explanation:[8][9]In 1963, when I assigned the name "quark" to the fundamental constituents of the nucleon, I had the sound first, without the spelling, which could have been "kwork". Then, in one of my occasional perusals of Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce, I came across the word "quark" in the phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark". Since "quark" (meaning, for one thing, the cry of the gull) was clearly intended to rhyme with "Mark," as well as "bark" and other such words, I had to find an excuse to pronounce it as "kwork". But the book represents the dream of a publican named Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker. Words in the text are typically drawn from several sources at once, like the "portmanteau" words in "Through the Looking Glass". From time to time, phrases occur in the book that are partially determined by calls for drinks at the bar. I argued, therefore, that perhaps one of the multiple sources of the cry "Three quarks for Muster Mark" might be "Three quarts for Mister Mark," in which case the pronunciation "kwork" would not be totally unjustified. In any case, the number three fitted perfectly the way quarks occur in nature. The phrase "three quarks" is a particularly good fit (as mentioned in the above quote), as at the time, there were only three known quarks, and since quarks appear in groups of three in baryons.In Joyce's use, it is seabirds giving "three quarks", akin to three cheers, "quark" having a meaning of the cry of a gull (probably onomatopoeia, like "quack" for ducks). The word is also a pun on the relationship between Munster and its provincial capital, CorkQuoteThere is a natural connection, first discovered by Eugene Wigner, between the properties of particles, the representation theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras, and the symmetries of the universe. According to it, the different states of an elementary particle furnishes an irreducible representation of the Poincare group. Moreover, the spectrum of different particles, and their properties, can be related to representations of Lie algebras which correspond to "approximate symmetries" of the universe.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 20th, 2008, 10:57 am

In Finnish as well.. Sounds fairly accurate Quotevirtavie, ohi Eilvan ja Aatomun, heitseistä rannan kaareen seppel-lahden, takaisin kiertää avarjen kulco modeus meidät Kuinks Linnaan ja Ympäröivaan. Herra Tristankki, rakkauksien vahinguttaja, yli irlamminmeren, oli ydimääräisen joentakaisin Pohjois-Panssarimerikasta tällä puolen Vähä-Euroopan kannaslaihelia voimistellakseen ...
Last edited by Cuchulainn on June 19th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 20th, 2008, 12:17 pm

The ballad of Perrse O Reilly
 
User avatar
Traden4Alpha
Posts: 23951
Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 20th, 2008, 12:36 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnIn Finnish as well.. Sounds fairly accurate Quotevirtavie, ohi Eilvan ja Aatomun, heitseistä rannan kaareen seppel-lahden, takaisin kiertää avarjen kulco modeus meidät Kuinks Linnaan ja Ympäröivaan. Herra Tristankki, rakkauksien vahinguttaja, yli irlamminmeren, oli ydimääräisen joentakaisin Pohjois-Panssarimerikasta tällä puolen Vähä-Euroopan kannaslaihelia voimistellakseen ...Aren't you quoting the "English" version? Perhaps there's a reason that JJ called it Finnegans Wake.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 20th, 2008, 1:32 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnIn Finnish as well.. Sounds fairly accurate QuoteAren't you quoting the "English" version? Perhaps there's a reason that JJ called it Finnegans Wake. I see someone doing a PhD on this: "James Joyce, the Finnish Connection", thesis submitted to the University of Western XXX for the degr. Ho ho Mr. Finn, you're going to be vined again.ee... The American (Huck) Finn is discussed herenor 6 had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse 7 to Laurens County's gorgios while they went doublin their mumper 8 all the time:
Last edited by Cuchulainn on June 19th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
TraderJoe
Posts: 11048
Joined: February 1st, 2005, 11:21 pm

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 20th, 2008, 3:18 pm

abstract poetry like abstract art is a complete and utter waste of spacetime .
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 21st, 2008, 12:10 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: TraderJoeabstract poetry like abstract art is a complete and utter waste of spacetime .On the other hand, it is cathartic! This is a difficult one to recite, especially the 100-letter word The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy help //If you think JJ is a waste of time, try sitting through the work of this Trinity graduate
Last edited by Cuchulainn on June 20th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Traden4Alpha
Posts: 23951
Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 21st, 2008, 1:01 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: TraderJoeabstract poetry like abstract art is a complete and utter waste of spacetime .On the other hand, it is cathartic!And highly lucrative.This Jackson Pollock sold for $140 million.QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally penned by: JoyceThe fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsyHmmm.... JJ seems to be speaking prophecy about TJ. Isn't TJ a future wallstrait oldparr who is heavily involved in christian minstrelsy????
Last edited by Traden4Alpha on June 20th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Topic Author
Posts: 60172
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 21st, 2008, 1:20 pm

QuoteHmmm.... JJ seems to be speaking prophecy about TJ. Isn't TJ a future wallstrait oldparr who is heavily involved in christian minstrelsy???? Trad,that's funny, even beter than JJ. How does the defendent plead, guilty or not guilty? "I have read this book and want to review it", December 5, 2000 By John McConnell The Wake is reviewed by so many people who haven't read it! How can anyone familiar with Joseph Campbell's Wings of Art or Skeleton Key, or even John Bishop's Joyce's Book of the Dark, suggest that the Wake is not great art? The greatest novelist of the twentieth century did not spend seventeen of his most creative years on a prank. Joyce had a flair for foreign languages, regarded Catholicism as "a beautiful lie", had at his disposal the collective wisdom of East and West, was *extremely* well read, gifted in music, delighted in wordplay, extensively researched the psychology of sleep, and was notoriously autobiographical in his literary productions. Joyce describes a night's dream in both biographical (Freudian) and archetypal (Jungian) terms: Brother against brother conflict, inevitable haunting guilt ("this municipal sin business"), raging lust percolating through "the fury and the mire of human veins", chrysalis-like psychological dependence on (temporal and ecclesiastical) authority, ultimate redemption through love, inevitable death. These motifs characterize both human history and tomorrow morning's news. And so, the Wake is *our* dream: Each of us is the poor harried protagonist Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker, subjected to the cold patrician ridicule of the Four Customers and Twelve Jurymen and burdened by guilt and the misplaced faith of our personal and collective innocence. Those with little patience for Joyce's presentation are not willing to reassess what a book should convey or else lack a herculean desire for wordplay. In defence of detractors, knowledge of at least one foreign language probably helps, as does general knowledge of comparative religion and mythology, Vico's historical cycles, Nietzsche's eternal recurrence, alchemy, Biblical tales, children's games, the history of English literature, etc. Perhaps the greatest obstacle to approaching the Wake is that many readers come in bad faith, unwilling to believe that an order is there, hidden in the obscure labyrinth of protean wordplay. If you want to turn the lead of the Wake into gold, then you must be a modern-day alchemist. And do not expect to complete the Great Work without much meditation and effort.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on June 20th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
TraderJoe
Posts: 11048
Joined: February 1st, 2005, 11:21 pm

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 21st, 2008, 3:50 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: TraderJoeabstract poetry like abstract art is a complete and utter waste of spacetime .On the other hand, it is cathartic!This is a difficult one to recite, especially the 100-letter word The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy I'm the first to admit, I love a good poem, but this is a load of bollocks! An acquired taste? PS I hope your code is not like this.Give it up cuch.
 
User avatar
TraderJoe
Posts: 11048
Joined: February 1st, 2005, 11:21 pm

Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce

June 21st, 2008, 8:50 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: TraderJoeabstract poetry like abstract art is a complete and utter waste of spacetime .On the other hand, it is cathartic!And highly lucrative.This Jackson Pollock sold for $140 million.Although I would quite happily take the commission on trading this piece of art for $140million, I personally wouldn't pay you $14 for it .
ABOUT WILMOTT

PW by JB

Wilmott.com has been "Serving the Quantitative Finance Community" since 2001. Continued...


Twitter LinkedIn Instagram

JOBS BOARD

JOBS BOARD

Looking for a quant job, risk, algo trading,...? Browse jobs here...


GZIP: On