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Traden4Alpha
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A Decadent Nobel: by Daniel Henninger, WSJ October 16 2009

November 19th, 2009, 10:50 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnSo what? And now what is Henninger's conclusions? He does not have any.. I would like to here his views directly and not what he probably means.It's different over here; as Anthis says there is a cultural backdrop to all of this. That's what we have chosen for.And that's a perfectly fine choice. In fact, one of my overarching concerns with any form of global government is in the removal of local choices such as these. Are agricultural subsidies "good" or "bad"? We won't know unless some communities have them and some do not. In fact, the question is answerable for at least two reasons. First, different societies may define "good" and "bad" differently -- the Dutch no doubt like their choice of economic tradeoffs, imports, exports, and land use patterns . Some people might even leave the country of their birth to live in the Netherlands. Others might want to prohibit what the Dutch do (e.g., your dikes are really insanely cool although some environmentalists probably go ape shit crazy over the thought of such large-scale modification of the natural environment). Second, the drastically non-stationary nature of economies, innovation, and evolution implies that we can never ever determine once and for all whether agricultural subsidies "good" or "bad" (even if we were to agree on a definition of good/bad). For these reasons, global government and the homogeneity that it brings are not "good" in my opinion. (But that's a bit beyond Henninger's stuff and might actually be a criticism of his piece)Subsidized agriculture is a minor issue -- the EU can readily afford to maintain all it's farmers in the lifestyle that are accustomed to with no trouble. Moreover, I doubt the Dutch need these subsidies at all because your farms are so productive (but if government is handing out "free" money, then why not take it?). The bigger issue mentioned by Henninger is the other mainstream social programs which consume much much larger chunks of the societal budget. Whereas farm subsidies pay for only a fraction of the livelihood of a tiny fraction of citizenry, social pension and welfare plans pay a much larger fraction of the living expenses of everybody eventually (unless they die before retirement). If countries were held to the same accounting standards as corporations, they would show horribly large liabilities on their balance sheets. The US, and the EU more so, have made choices that are not sustainable. It's easy to promise everyone a nice pension, good medical care, and unemployment/poverty benefits. But delivering them is another issue, especially given the birth rates in the developed world (which Henninger also mentioned). Against, it's not the choice that's being criticized, it's the math.P.S. The Netherlands' agricultural imports roughly equal it's agricultural exports. The Dutch export a lot of really nice cheese (yum ), but they import grain to feed those cows (and the people). It appears that 16 million people, 18 million large livestock (cows, pigs, and sheep), and some 100 million chickens cannot live on only 10 million acres. (perhaps you guys need to add some more land. )P.P.S. The above is my opinion (not Henninger's) although I suspect that he would agree with some of what I have said.
 
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A Decadent Nobel: by Daniel Henninger, WSJ October 16 2009

November 19th, 2009, 11:17 pm

QuoteYour earlier mention of Egyptian potatoes made me laugh because it highlights just how nontraditional our "traditional cuisine" has become. Any "Greek" food that contains potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini/courgette, or eggplant/aubergine, is not truly traditional. The first three came from the Americas in the 1500s (zucchini may not have appeared until the 1800s) and eggplant came to the Mediterranean in the Middle Ages from India/Asia by way of Arab traders. Thus all of these plants (and associated cuisine) would have been entirely unknown to the classic Greek culture"Traditional" may not necessarily mean "classic". Certain animals, fruits and vegetables may have been imported from another land some centuries ago, but have been adapted to the local environment, have grown to different varieties and are an integral part of local cuisine. I am just horrified if today's "junk" food, imported mainly from America, is considered as "traditional" after 200 years.
 
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A Decadent Nobel: by Daniel Henninger, WSJ October 16 2009

November 19th, 2009, 11:37 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: AnthisQuoteYour earlier mention of Egyptian potatoes made me laugh because it highlights just how nontraditional our "traditional cuisine" has become. Any "Greek" food that contains potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini/courgette, or eggplant/aubergine, is not truly traditional. The first three came from the Americas in the 1500s (zucchini may not have appeared until the 1800s) and eggplant came to the Mediterranean in the Middle Ages from India/Asia by way of Arab traders. Thus all of these plants (and associated cuisine) would have been entirely unknown to the classic Greek culture"Traditional" may not necessarily mean "classic". Certain animals, fruits and vegetables may have been imported from another land some centuries ago, but have been adapted to the local environment, have grown to different varieties and are an integral part of local cuisine. I am just horrified if today's "junk" food, imported mainly from America, is considered as "traditional" after 200 years.Yes, junk food is horrible. The scary part is that eating right is actually more expensive than eating junk. We've reached a point where the poor probably eat a higher-fat, higher-calorie, higher-salt diet than do the rich (the exact opposite of the classic civilization in which calories, fat, and salt were expensive). What I find interesting is how much traditional (even classic) cuisine depends on global trade. Even if one can transplant/adapt many foods from their native lands, a good fraction of the spices (cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, etc.) that give so many foods their "traditional" tastes still depend on the thousands of years of global trade that continues to this day.
 
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A Decadent Nobel: by Daniel Henninger, WSJ October 16 2009

November 20th, 2009, 10:25 am

QuoteP.S. The Netherlands' agricultural imports roughly equal it's agricultural exports. The Dutch export a lot of really nice cheese (yum ), but they import grain to feed those cows (and the people). It appears that 16 million people, 18 million large livestock (cows, pigs, and sheep), and some 100 million chickens cannot live on only 10 million acres. (perhaps you guys need to add some more land. )QuoteOne of the curious facts of the Netherlands: nearly 85 percent of the population own at least one bicycle. They use it regularly, often daily. There are about 16 million bicycles in Holland, slightly more than one for every inhabitant. About 1.3 million new bicycles are sold every year.More land? SureNa een internationale aanbestedingsprocedure is aannemersconsortium PUMA (Project Uitbreiding Maasvlakte) gecontracteerd voor de aanleg van de eerste terreinen. In PUMA werken Boskalis en Van Oord samen om in 2013 de eerste terreinen op te leveren voor de eerste klanten. Al met al gaat het in deze eerste fase om 700 hectare havengebied. Na oplevering in 2013 is PUMA voor nog eens vijf jaar verantwoordelijk voor het onderhoud van de zeewering. Ook dat is onderdeel van het contract.
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A Decadent Nobel: by Daniel Henninger, WSJ October 16 2009

March 2nd, 2013, 12:03 pm

Henninger: The Obamaian Universe A place where everything revolves around the fixed planet of public spending.By DANIEL HENNINGER
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Re: A Decadent Nobel: by Daniel Henninger, WSJ October 16 2009

November 4th, 2019, 8:53 pm

update
Trump Didn’t Kill the Bush Values

https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-didn ... 1544053897
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