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trackstar
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 1st, 2018, 10:47 am

Not at all - that would not occur to me.

But look at the Persian’s attitude.

No matter how good life might be - his crystal food bowl is full, he has countless soft couches and beds to sleep on, he is tended to by people who adore him -

He still has that imperial pout.

The Millennium Problems are not solved yet. :D
 
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Collector
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 1st, 2018, 11:09 pm

what is the definition of a mathematical artifact? I noticed certain academics (quackademics) like to label mathematical results they don’t like, as mathematical artifacts when not fitting their view. There is a very long history of this.

what is the theory and foundation for what can  be expelled as mathematical artifacts from a theory? 

also with empirical data, for example Osborn throwing out his own empirical study as something wrong just because it did not fit his Gaussian-brain!
 
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tw
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 2nd, 2018, 9:58 pm

Do you think math finance would make more sense if it wasn't developed mostly by physicists-long-past-sell-by-date? (It only sounds passive-aggressive.)
It would be best if most physicists stay out of it entirely because they don't understand complex adaptive systems.  No electrons ever looked for a loophole in a physicist's model to make a profit.  No proton ever tried to fool a physicist by gaming the results of a particle accelerator run.  

For the most part, biologists (especially ecologists) understand these things much better.
Economists, ecologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, ... have more adequate background, but used to lack the analytical apparatus (it's been quickly changing for recent years though). Physics is a beautiful and well-established field of science, but applying its forces to human minds has drastic effects :-)
I love reading the literature on mathematical biology, ecology, genetics and population dynamics  (or at least the odd Springer introductory
text I get the time to read).  The systems are wonderfully complex, pattern filled and nonlinear from the get go.
Although there are contributions from Hardy, Turing and Haldane the subject has quite a new feel.
However there is a definite note of model infatuation, which I guess happens when much is new and there is a lot of argument by analogy and model construction off the cuff.

So are ecologists smarter that physicists at seeing the bigger picture? It feels like different disciplines set different values on scepticism vs. speculative 
model development. 
From statisticians' "all models are wrong but some are useful", to the physicists' withering put down a la Pauli "it's not even wrong" to the blind faith
of the macro economist high priests; the biologists feel on the less sceptical end of the spectrum.

But all this feels very current due the current pace of genetic technology. The story of human introduction of foreign species into particular ecosystems
has an awful hubristic history (cane toads, wolf snails vs. African giant snails, Australian rabbits, rhododendrons in Scotland and Wales).
Now we are on the very point of introducing genetically modified mosquitoes to eradicate malaria.
I am a generally sanguine person, and a believer in a long arc of scientific progress but lets hope these biologists have done their homework and really do know
their shit.
 
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Paul
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 3rd, 2018, 8:42 am

Mathematical Biology was the hot topic just before Quant Finance came along and hoovered up all the talent, good and bad.
 
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Paul
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 4th, 2018, 3:05 pm

When are moles going to learn/evolve to make smaller molehills?
 
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tw
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 4th, 2018, 3:33 pm

When are moles going to learn/evolve to make smaller molehills?
What eats moles? And under what cirumstances?
 
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ppauper
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 4th, 2018, 3:33 pm

When are moles going to learn/evolve to make smaller molehills?
don't make a mountain out of a molehill?
 
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Traden4Alpha
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 4th, 2018, 4:43 pm

When are moles going to learn/evolve to make smaller molehills?
When everyone carefully kills all the big molehill moles but lets the small molehill moles live and breed. Continuous filtering on the median will drive evolution to ever smaller molehills.
 
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Paul
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 4th, 2018, 6:12 pm

Haven't people been doing this for many generations of moles? I know I have. Another nail in the coffin for evolution?
 
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tw
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 4th, 2018, 8:12 pm

Haven't people been doing this for many generations of moles? I know I have. Another nail in the coffin for evolution?
.
On a tangent, is it a coincidence that the sympathetically written characters of Wind in the Willows are all culled as pests (Mr Mole, Ratty and Mr Badger).
The unsympathetic are all protected or domesticated (stoats, ferrets, etc.). That Edwardian anthropomorphisation and class assignment went a little askew?
Mr Toad, (the model of a trend following flow trader if ever I saw one)  has armies of volunteers to help him cross the road.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 4th, 2018, 8:38 pm

With enough molehills, you can make a mountain.

BTW our willow tree of > 80 years has not grown any leaves this year. The willow whisperer will inspect it tomorrow.

Anyone with experience of willow trees and their issues? Should we talk to it?>
65000
 
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Paul
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 5th, 2018, 5:24 am

Haven't people been doing this for many generations of moles? I know I have. Another nail in the coffin for evolution?
.
On a tangent, is it a coincidence that the sympathetically written characters of Wind in the Willows are all culled as pests (Mr Mole, Ratty and Mr Badger).
The unsympathetic are all protected or domesticated (stoats, ferrets, etc.). That Edwardian anthropomorphisation and class assignment went a little askew?
Mr Toad, (the model of a trend following flow trader if ever I saw one)  has armies of volunteers to help him cross the road.
Chief Weasel is Jeremy Corbyn. The stoats are Momentum members. And Toad is a member of the upper class. Corbyn has already said he wants to take over the houses of the rich. Wilmott Hall will be invaded by smelly Leftists.
 
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Traden4Alpha
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 5th, 2018, 12:05 pm

With enough molehills, you can make a mountain.

BTW our willow tree of > 80 years has not grown any leaves this year. The willow whisperer will inspect it tomorrow.

Anyone with experience of willow trees and their issues? Should we talk to it?>
I hope your willow is not pining for the fjords!

Is there a chance it was hit by a late freeze? Are other willows in the area also late in leafing out?
 
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bearish
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 5th, 2018, 12:25 pm

With enough molehills, you can make a mountain.

BTW our willow tree of > 80 years has not grown any leaves this year. The willow whisperer will inspect it tomorrow.

Anyone with experience of willow trees and their issues? Should we talk to it?>
I hope your willow is not pining for the fjords!

Is there a chance it was hit by a late freeze? Are other willows in the area also late in leafing out?
Hopefully not a case of Dutch willow disease
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: Stupid question of the day

June 5th, 2018, 3:01 pm

tt is a weeping willow. It is suffering from watermark sickness. It is rust in peace.
It was planted by the previous owner to the memory of his daughter who fell into the adjoining waterway and drowned.
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