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hayes
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 9:28 am

This would seem like a strange place to post this question, but I believe we have several wilottians here who live in a country that is largely below sea level. So here goes:I am purchasing a Victorian house in London that is in pretty good condition, except for a bit of rising damp. This is mostly because of a patio that is too high, (causing splashback from the rain) and possibly because there is less ventilation now than there used to be (double glazing and modern paints give the walls less opportunity to beathe and dry out).My question is how do houses built in Holland avoid problems like damp, when as soon as you start digging into the ground, you hit water?
 
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Cuchulainn
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 9:36 am

First, is the deal done and dusted? Or can you haggle a bit on the deal? Was an engineering study made of the ground under the house?
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zeta
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 9:47 am

we have an old federal home (~1860) in the US built over a cave system & subterranean creek; without a dehumidifier running there's a veritable swimming pool in the basement
 
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hayes
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 10:13 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnFirst, is the deal done and dusted? Or can you haggle a bit on the deal? Was an engineering study made of the ground under the house?Not done and dusted - It is certainly the cornerstone of the whole deal now but shouldn't be too much of a problem to negotiate. The property is 150 years old, it's going to have some issues regardless of how well it has been looked after.
 
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hayes
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 10:16 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: outrunInteresting question.In Amsterdam they are worried about the opposite. Amsterdam houses are build on top of wooden poles that were driven into the ground. The trouble is that those will start to rot if the water level drops. All regions have water pumps to control the ground water levels.Interesting answer. I didn't know any of that, (except I seem to recall that the old windmills were the original water pumps, is that right?)So is damp ever a problem in old (or new) homes?
 
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farmer
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 10:27 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: hayesa bit of rising damp. This is mostly because of a patio that is too high, (causing splashback from the rain) and possibly because there is less ventilation now than there used to be (double glazing and modern paints give the walls less opportunity to beathe and dry out).Fix the roof or the patio or the outside paint or the gutters or whatever you need to fix. It should be able to rain sideways and 100% runs off and 0% gets in.The interior pipes could be leaky.This idea of walls getting damp and drying is not something I have ever seen in my life in any climate. They should not get damp in the first place. And if they do, there is nothing to save you from losing the wall.
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Cuchulainn
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 10:43 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: hayesQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnFirst, is the deal done and dusted? Or can you haggle a bit on the deal? Was an engineering study made of the ground under the house?Not done and dusted - It is certainly the cornerstone of the whole deal now but shouldn't be too much of a problem to negotiate. The property is 150 years old, it's going to have some issues regardless of how well it has been looked after.I would investigate. Caveart emptor. Let seller's engineer convince you.Some questions:1. Are there mature trees in vicinity (tree roots have a tendency to grow into (sewage) pipes, serious). I have a real-life anecdote on this, but it is lunch-time 2. Underground rivers3. Are you sure it's rising damp (root cause analysis, no pun intended).4. If water table changes, then the cracks in the wall.5. Does the house have foundations, ueberhaupt??I live near North Sea and big canal. Bought a 100-year old house 11 years ago. Knocked it down. Then we built a 5 metre deep foundation and rebuilt in the original style using 21st centuy technology, as zeta can testify to.BTW you might be be able to negotiate grants for double glazing.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on September 29th, 2011, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 10:48 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: outrunI still need double glazing, Cuch,.. what are the grant options? Did you get any?No, I built everything anew!
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 11:18 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: outrunQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: outrunI still need double glazing, Cuch,.. what are the grant options? Did you get any?No, I built everything anew!Tsk tsk..that doesn't sound optimal (ala Bellman). You could have asked for the grant on the old house *prior* to knocking it down!Well, they don't give grants for new houses, mate Grants are just peanuts, not worth the effort.Penny-wise and pound foolish. It's not worth the effort, paper-work, etc. etc. etc. And what if the impose a tax on you double-glazed windows?"Goedkoop is duurkoop"
Last edited by Cuchulainn on September 29th, 2011, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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hayes
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 11:20 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: farmerQuoteOriginally posted by: hayesa bit of rising damp. This is mostly because of a patio that is too high, (causing splashback from the rain) and possibly because there is less ventilation now than there used to be (double glazing and modern paints give the walls less opportunity to beathe and dry out).Fix the roof or the patio or the outside paint or the gutters or whatever you need to fix. It should be able to rain sideways and 100% runs off and 0% gets in.The interior pipes could be leaky.This idea of walls getting damp and drying is not something I have ever seen in my life in any climate. They should not get damp in the first place. And if they do, there is nothing to save you from losing the wall.It's interesting that the US has every climate, and you've not ever experienced/ heard of the problem. Also that for british built houses have survived (pretty much) for centuries without this problem. It's a relatively new issue and is all about modern materials being used without thinking about the consequences. Historically, waterproof materials were expensive. Thatched roofs for example, allow most water to wash off, and then dry out in the sun later. A lot of flats built in the 50's-70's have rising damp because new materials were available cheaply, but the builders gave little thought to ventilation.
Last edited by hayes on September 29th, 2011, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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hayes
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 11:25 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: hayesQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnFirst, is the deal done and dusted? Or can you haggle a bit on the deal? Was an engineering study made of the ground under the house?Not done and dusted - It is certainly the cornerstone of the whole deal now but shouldn't be too much of a problem to negotiate. The property is 150 years old, it's going to have some issues regardless of how well it has been looked after.I would investigate. Caveart emptor. Let seller's engineer convince you.Some questions:1. Are there mature trees in vicinity (tree roots have a tendency to grow into (sewage) pipes, serious). I have a real-life anecdote on this, but it is lunch-time 2. Underground rivers3. Are you sure it's rising damp (root cause analysis, no pun intended).4. If water table changes, then the cracks in the wall.5. Does the house have foundations, ueberhaupt??I live near North Sea and big canal. Bought a 100-year old house 11 years ago. Knocked it down. Then we built a 5 metre deep foundation and rebuilt in the original style using 21st centuy technology, as zeta can testify to.BTW you might be be able to negotiate grants for double glazing.One tree that is too close, but not causing any damage (yet) - That will come down straight away though. No underground rivers, I've had 2 independant surveys that say it is mild rising damp. Nothing serious enough to cause cracking etc so long as it is addressed now. It's been there for 150 years and hasn't fallen down yet, so I assume there must be some foundations, although I have no idea how deep. I think if that was the problem it would've caused more problems by now than just a bit of damp, but it's possible.I think it is a pretty simple job. Sort out what is causing the problem, and fix the damage. It's freehold so I won't need to worry about landlords or obstructive neighbours.Can you tell us the tree story?
Last edited by hayes on September 29th, 2011, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Rising Damp in Holland

September 30th, 2011, 11:27 am

QuoteCan you tell us the tree story? It's a true story. I'll post it soon It's funny.Hint: a 'rising' it was, but not 'damp' as we know it, Jim.Stay tuned.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on September 29th, 2011, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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