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Cuchulainn
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 24th, 2012, 7:30 pm

But suddenly I viddied that thinking was for the gloopy ones and that the oomny ones use, like, inspiration and what Bog sends. For now it was lovely music that came to my aid. There was a window open with the stereo on and I viddied right at once what to do. ..Ho, ho, ho! Well, if it isn't fat stinking billy goat Billy Boy in poison! How art thou, thou globby bottle of cheap, stinking chip oil? Come and get one in the yarbles, if ya have any yarbles, you eunuch jelly thou! Gioacchino Rossini, la gazza ladra
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exneratunrisk
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 25th, 2012, 9:45 am

uv and ....The German neuroscience and music researcher Spitzer says: it is not the melodies and harmonies that drive us tears ..., icy showers down the neck, ... it is the unexpected breaks, rythm changes, peaks, ... and "unexpected" means unexpected.BTW, I am not so interested in what was new then, but what do I hear now, having listened to all kind of music ...(There is only one Mozart opera that has parts, I can still listen to: Don Giovanni).IMO, it gets "worse" here: ... down to Verdi and even Rossini (terrible flow-production opera maker ...)Sometimes I think, classical music debates suffer from a kind of "Abilane Paradox"?! BTW, I currently listen to The Penguins in Bondage - Frank Zappa.
Last edited by exneratunrisk on December 24th, 2012, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 25th, 2012, 8:34 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskIMO, it gets "worse" here: ... down to [...] even Rossini (terrible flow-production opera maker ...)Even worse; how many people cannot write his first name correctly
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exneratunrisk
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 26th, 2012, 6:50 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskIMO, it gets "worse" here: ... down to [...] even Rossini (terrible flow-production opera maker ...)Even worse; how many people cannot write his first name correctly Names are holy, but I find it would be a good start for a "divorce" Who did, BTW? Krzysztof (Penderecki) is also difficult (for me) ... But Luigi (Nono), Udo (Zimmermann) ... are easy.
 
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Ultraviolet
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 26th, 2012, 3:32 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskuv and ....The German neuroscience and music researcher Spitzer says: it is not the melodies and harmonies that drive us tears ..., icy showers down the neck, ... it is the unexpected breaks, rythm changes, peaks, ... and "unexpected" means unexpected.BTW, I am not so interested in what was new then, but what do I hear now, having listened to all kind of music ...(There is only one Mozart opera that has parts, I can still listen to: Don Giovanni).IMO, it gets "worse" here: ... down to Verdi and even Rossini (terrible flow-production opera maker ...)Sometimes I think, classical music debates suffer from a kind of "Abilane Paradox"?! I guess there's only one way to be always surprised with a musical composition, which makes it a bit sad that you and Herr Spitzer can listen to any piece only once. What's more "unexpected" for you - Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony with its freedom of interpretation and the chaotic random noises of Nature or the tight, perfected avant-garde Penderecki's concert for the victims of Hieroshima? There's a lot of atonality and time-signature changes also in Mozart piano compositions and symphonies. They often trick me into guessing who's the modern composer, while Schoenberg or Berg I can recognise easily, so I don't understand Spitz's definition. I also don't understand why he cries at the "unexpected" parts - for me these are the sympathy and emotions the music can ignite in my heart: Mozart's arias make it stop, Bach's awfully predictable passages put me in a serene mood, familiar rhythms of Chopin's mazurkas and polonaises I can play almost without notes (I rather have problems with stretching my fingers over all keys than predicting the next chord), ... only in an empty void there's no sound.Maybe opera is not a good musical form for you? It's purpose was to tell a funny or romantic story, present an extraordinary voice, propaganda, ..., but not really to surprise the listener with its (based on one motif repeated and modified according to well-defined - getting stricter in time - rules of the consecutive parts) structure. Roger Waters wrote an opera...
 
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Cuchulainn
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December 26th, 2012, 3:42 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: UltravioletQuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskuv and ....The German neuroscience and music researcher Spitzer says: it is not the melodies and harmonies that drive us tears ..., icy showers down the neck, ... it is the unexpected breaks, rythm changes, peaks, ... and "unexpected" means unexpected.BTW, I am not so interested in what was new then, but what do I hear now, having listened to all kind of music ...(There is only one Mozart opera that has parts, I can still listen to: Don Giovanni).IMO, it gets "worse" here: ... down to Verdi and even Rossini (terrible flow-production opera maker ...)Sometimes I think, classical music debates suffer from a kind of "Abilane Paradox"?! I guess there's only one way to be always surprised with a musical composition, which makes it a bit sad that you and Herr Spitzer can listen to any piece only once. What's more "unexpected" for you - Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony with its freedom of interpretation and the chaotic random noises of Nature or the tight, perfected avant-garde Penderecki's concert for the victims of Hieroshima? There's a lot of atonality and time-signature changes also in Mozart piano compositions and symphonies. They often trick me into guessing who's the modern composer, while Schoenberg or Berg I can recognise easily, so I don't understand Spitz's definition. I also don't understand why he cries at the "unexpected" parts - for me these are the sympathy and emotions the music can ignite in my heart: Mozart's arias make it stop, Bach's awfully predictable passages put me in a serene mood, familiar rhythms of Chopin's mazurkas and polonaises I can play almost without notes (I rather have problems with stretching my fingers over all keys than predicting the next chord), ... only in an empty void there's no sound.Maybe opera is not a good musical form for you? It's purpose was to tell a funny or romantic story, present an extraordinary voice, propaganda, ..., but not really to surprise the listener with its (based on one motif repeated and modified according to well-defined - getting stricter in time - rules of the consecutive parts) structure. Roger Waters wrote an opera...Maybe starts with operetta and then move on to the hard stuff when you have a few operettes under your belt.
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Cuchulainn
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 26th, 2012, 4:06 pm

willow, tit willow
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Cuchulainn
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December 26th, 2012, 4:08 pm

Frans Lehár, Die lustige Witwe
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Gamal
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 26th, 2012, 4:56 pm

I don't believe you like Penderecki, exneratunrisk. You've made an error in his name twice.
 
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Cuchulainn
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December 26th, 2012, 5:05 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: GamalI don't believe you like Penderecki, exneratunrisk. You've made an error in his name twice.hmmm..
 
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Gamal
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 26th, 2012, 5:15 pm

You call this cloke a genius, Cuchulainn? Without beard, without glasses? Look here at a real genius!
 
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Cuchulainn
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 26th, 2012, 5:30 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: GamalYou call this cloke a genius, Cuchulainn? Without beard, without glasses? Look here at a real genius!He looks like famous Soviet guy like Tychonoff or Samarski."The 20th Century is over. Pastiche, irony, alienation, avant-garde posturing, minimalism, and shock are played out. We need music that fights back and evinces the positive that still does, or could, exist"According to Mark Hagerty (who, BTW is a very good CAD/CAM guy). But I no nothing, any music after Italian 14th century is pop music, for me With a few exceptions like Purcell, Schubert and Iron Maiden.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on December 25th, 2012, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 26th, 2012, 5:44 pm

 
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exneratunrisk
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 27th, 2012, 8:08 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: UltravioletQuoteOriginally posted by: exneratunriskuv and ....The German neuroscience and music researcher Spitzer says: it is not the melodies and harmonies that drive us tears ..., icy showers down the neck, ... it is the unexpected breaks, rythm changes, peaks, ... and "unexpected" means unexpected.BTW, I am not so interested in what was new then, but what do I hear now, having listened to all kind of music ...(There is only one Mozart opera that has parts, I can still listen to: Don Giovanni).IMO, it gets "worse" here: ... down to Verdi and even Rossini (terrible flow-production opera maker ...)Sometimes I think, classical music debates suffer from a kind of "Abilane Paradox"?! I guess there's only one way to be always surprised with a musical composition, which makes it a bit sad that you and Herr Spitzer can listen to any piece only once. What's more "unexpected" for you - Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony with its freedom of interpretation and the chaotic random noises of Nature or the tight, perfected avant-garde Penderecki's concert for the victims of Hieroshima? There's a lot of atonality and time-signature changes also in Mozart piano compositions and symphonies. They often trick me into guessing who's the modern composer, while Schoenberg or Berg I can recognise easily, so I don't understand Spitz's definition. I also don't understand why he cries at the "unexpected" parts - for me these are the sympathy and emotions the music can ignite in my heart: Mozart's arias make it stop, Bach's awfully predictable passages put me in a serene mood, familiar rhythms of Chopin's mazurkas and polonaises I can play almost without notes (I rather have problems with stretching my fingers over all keys than predicting the next chord), ... only in an empty void there's no sound.Maybe opera is not a good musical form for you? It's purpose was to tell a funny or romantic story, present an extraordinary voice, propaganda, ..., but not really to surprise the listener with its (based on one motif repeated and modified according to well-defined - getting stricter in time - rules of the consecutive parts) structure. Roger Waters wrote an opera...I love opera, but again Wagner+ ... BTW, only once would mean much too simple .. it should be some work to create a few new subneural patterns from the signals sent by the ear? Yesterday I listened to Perilat, ... by Dusapin that I had the luck to see at its 2003 premiere (Colon conducting) in Paris - still surprise ... but I need to confess, I highlighted the "unexpected" to be more pointed after Perilat, .. I listened to the Charlie Haden Montreal Tapes
Last edited by exneratunrisk on December 26th, 2012, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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exneratunrisk
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Selection of Best Classical Music

December 27th, 2012, 8:13 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: GamalI don't believe you like Penderecki, exneratunrisk. You've made an error in his name twice.I just took the name from my Herenberg (comprehensive German Opera Guide) - if they are wrong I am ... (bit it could also be my keyboard-dyslexia?)
Last edited by exneratunrisk on December 26th, 2012, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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