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outrun
Posts: 4573
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Re: machine learning and big data

October 4th, 2016, 1:45 pm

The question is: Why are you so full of negative prejudice about things? You very often are. What purpose does it serve you? You should investigate that.

Is it mimicry of ego? Sometimes people who are considered knowledgable about a subject can have strong opinions about things going on.

You don't need that, enjoy the achievement of other people, you harvest what you sow.
 
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outrun
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Re: machine learning and big data

October 4th, 2016, 1:49 pm

Sigh, Microsoft..

How about this famous intro course: https://www.coursera.org/learn/machine-learning

Andrew Ng caused a revolution and yet he's the most humble lecturer I've ever seen. 4.9/5.0 stars, very educational.
 
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bearish
Posts: 5368
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Re: machine learning and big data

October 16th, 2016, 2:02 am

I spent some time at a conference last week hanging out with an old friend, a business school academic, who has drifted from finance toward data analytics. In part due to his location, he is extremely well connected with the people who decide on hiring criteria for the key Silicon Valley shops. His message was that the current requirement for non-technical people, in particular MBAs, is fluency in Python and R, as well as enough familiarity with databases to be able to grab data without much handholding. That does not mesh well with the profile of most MBAs I know...

At this event I also had occasion to enjoy a rather impressive lecture by Michael Jordan (the famous one, not the basketball player) who seemed to suggest (among a host of other sub-topics) that data science/inference/machine learning has not yet really reached the status of a proper engineering field, and that we will probably live down some major disasters in the area before it gets there -- decades later.

Oh - minor edit - he was the advisor of Andrew Ng.
 
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outrun
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Re: machine learning and big data

October 16th, 2016, 9:47 am

Found a nice booklist by Michael Jordan: "not only do I think that you should eventually read all of these books (or some similar list that reflects your own view of foundations), but I think that you should read all of them three times—the first time you barely understand, the second time you start to get it, and the third time it all seems obvious."

I think what's currently going on is very interesting and profound. There is a big research boom (see plot below), *and* extremely short release cycles of new research tools to production. It seems almost *any* narrow human domain skill can now be surpassed by some ML tool.  The other day some kid taught a neural network to lipread from video,.. things like that are apparently easy now.

What puzzles me is the "major disasters". Nobody is giving examples. I can imagine that a flawed self driving car can cause disasters, or a flawed HF trading bot, but the disasters would not be caused by the technology but by lack of testing and safeguards *). Abuse of these powers is another potential disaster.
Image
*) I was once was talking to a clearing party about getting direct access to the exchange matching engines for my algo startup. They said that their access was very fast because they had stripped out all checks like price limits, volume limits, margin limits. I would need to do some simple test to show robustness. 
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: machine learning and big data

December 2nd, 2016, 10:05 pm

At this event I also had occasion to enjoy a rather impressive lecture by Michael Jordan (the famous one, not the basketball player) who seemed to suggest (among a host of other sub-topics) that data science/inference/machine learning has not yet really reached the status of a proper engineering field, and that we will probably live down some major disasters in the area before it gets there -- decades later.
So, it is now the "bleeding edge" technology?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_adopter
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl

Every Time We Teach a Child Something, We Keep Him from Inventing It Himself
Jean Piaget
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: machine learning and big data

December 11th, 2016, 1:15 pm

Neural karaoke

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/ ... esearchers

By the sound of it, the AI algorithm does not use Mozart's Golden Ratio.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl

Every Time We Teach a Child Something, We Keep Him from Inventing It Himself
Jean Piaget
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: machine learning and big data

February 26th, 2017, 9:55 pm

Saw this on Quantnet

"
  1. but IMO applied math with sufficient knowledge of CS puts you in a better position career wise rather than the other way around. My adviser argues that machine learning is just an area of applied math and stats that was taken over by computer scientists. "
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl

Every Time We Teach a Child Something, We Keep Him from Inventing It Himself
Jean Piaget
 
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outrun
Posts: 4573
Joined: April 29th, 2016, 1:40 pm

Re: machine learning and big data

February 27th, 2017, 5:16 am

Saw this on Quantnet

"
  1. but IMO applied math with sufficient knowledge of CS puts you in a better position career wise rather than the other way around. My adviser argues that machine learning is just an area of applied math and stats that was taken over by computer scientists. "
Hmm.. this seems like a biased view: a chemist saying that doing chemistry puts you in the best position for a job at CERN. 
There is indeed *a lot* of applied stats and the math behind it (ML of often called statistical learning). The list below lists a range of the basic statistical methods you'll see in "introduction in ML". Outside CS physics seems to be the best position for a ML career,  there are strong links between statistical learning and energy/information (e.g. first entry at the top left mentions "Boltzmann Machines")Image
 
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DominicConnor
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Re: machine learning and big data

March 12th, 2017, 5:21 pm

MS is talking about the things that MS is trying to sell.
 
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rmax
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Re: machine learning and big data

March 23rd, 2017, 6:28 pm

This is how Microsoft defines ML; what are they talking about?
Reminds me of this from HHG:

The Encyclopedia Galactica defines a robot as a mechanical apparatus designed to do the work of a man. The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation defines a robot as "Your Plastic Pal Who's Fun to Be With."

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy defines the marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation as "a bunch of mindless jerks who'll be the first against the wall when the revolution comes," with a footnote to the effect that the editors would welcome applications from anyone interested in taking over the post of robotics correspondent.

Curiously enough, an edition of the Encyclopedia Galactica that had the good fortune to fall through a time warp from a thousand years in the future defined the marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation as "a bunch of mindless jerks who were the first against the wall when the revolution came."
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