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Alkmene
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 3:19 am

Hi there,This might be a repeat but it is close to my heart. Maybe someone can help.I am keen to do a PhD (I have a Masters in Business Science and a Masters in Statistics). Preferrably in mathematics of financial engineering.The questions are:- what are the faster PhD/doctorate courses out there?- are there any programs that are done by coursework only?- are there any programs that give credit for past degrees?- how do I go about finding a universe of universities - just googling blindly feels wrong.I should mention that money is not an issue as I am an old f*rt and do it more out of interest than anything else.Cheers,Alk
 
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mj
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 4:03 am

>- are there any programs that are done by coursework only?a phd by coursework only is a contradiction in terms, I think you should rethink the idea of doing a PhD
 
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Alkmene
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 6:27 am

Thanks very much mj.Constructive and to the point? I appreciate your opinion and I am full of admiration for your obviously vast knowledge on the subjects discussed in this forum.This answer, however disappoints on a few levels but using my vast intellect, I guess I read between the lines that the answer, in your opinion, is "no"?There might be a misunderstanding that I wanted to do a PhD by coursework only? I was just wondering if there are any.Why do my questions preclude me from a PhD? “Normal deviate” is a contradiction in terms if the terms are misrepresented? This does not preclude people who use it from doing PhDs.Furthermore, as my question pertains to PhDs and Doctorates, I can't see why this is a contradiction in terms; a doctorate can be honorary and would not necessitate any coursework, if you are into the finer points of language.I am constantly working with quants as a quant; most of them are socially incompetent. I wonder if this is hubris or the incompetence of the environment to spot how sad some of the smart a*ses are and how simple some of the concepts they are peddling.I guess you are just having a bad day at work. So do I. But I can cope and try to keep my dignity.Have a nice day.Alk
 
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ArthurDent
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 8:19 am

Phd entails research, not merely course work. If you are willing to work hard, there is no reason you should be unable to do it. (Note: Smart, or young, is not a necessary condition.)Quote- how do I go about finding a universe of universities - just googling blindly feels wrong.This is the normal procedure: Read some research on your own, find out what interests you, talk to the authors, ask someone to supervise you part/full time, apply there (which includes writing GRE, sending the old transcripts, writing comprehensive subject exams and/or attending a few to several classes), see if the professors you wanted to work with are still around, write a paper or two with them. Lather, rinse and repeat, until your committee members think you're clean.It's a fun 3-4 years of relaxed contemplation if you do it full time, and a hectic 4-6 years if you try to do it part time!
Last edited by ArthurDent on February 4th, 2008, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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msperlin
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 9:51 am

QuoteThe questions are:1) what are the faster PhD/doctorate courses out there?2) are there any programs that are done by coursework only?3) are there any programs that give credit for past degrees?4) how do I go about finding a universe of universities - just googling blindly feels wrong.1) Sorry, but such thing doesn't exist. The PhD length will depend mostly of yourself and your supervisor. And choosing it based on how fast you finish is quite suspicious. I agree with mj on this one, if this is your main motivation, you should really rethink of what you want to do. 2) No. There is a lots of research involved (papers to deliver, research seminars, presentations, etc). I would guess that the average of credits for a general phd program is 20%, maybe less.3) I'm not sure if that exist for the unverse of phd programs, but, from what I know, it doesn't look quite right.4) Arthurdent suggestion is quite good. First pick a subject and read about it. After that search for possible supervisors (people that research on the topic) and start applying.
 
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Cuchulainn
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 11:57 am

Quotewiki: The detailed requirements for award of a Ph.D. vary throughout the world; however, there are a number of common factors. A candidate must submit a thesis or dissertation consisting of a suitable body of original academic research, which is in principle worthy of publication in a peer-refereed context.[2] In many countries a candidate must defend this work before a panel of expert examiners appointed by the university; in other countries, the dissertation is examined by a panel of expert examiners who stipulate whether the dissertation is in principle passable and the issues that need to be addressed before the dissertation can be passed. There is usually a prescribed minimum period of study (typically two to three years full time) which must take place before submission of the thesis (this requirement is usually waived for academic staff submitting a portfolio of peer-reviewed published work).The candidate may also be required to successfully complete a certain number of additional advanced courses relevant to their area of specialization. In some countries (the US and Canada, for example), most of the universities require coursework for Ph.D. degrees. In many other countries (especially those, such as the UK, which have a greater degree of specialization at the undergraduate level) there is no such condition in general. It is not uncommon, however, for individual universities or departments to specify analogous requirements for students not already in possession of a master's degree. Universities in the non-English-speaking world have begun adopting similar standards to those of the Anglophone Ph.D. for their research doctorates (see, for example, Bologna Process).[3]
 
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AvatarPh
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 12:33 pm

I am in agreement with MJ and Cuchullain that PhD is not intended to be a coursework, but research work advancing the new idea.
 
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cryptic26
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PhD - questions

February 5th, 2008, 9:01 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: AlkmeneHi there,This might be a repeat but it is close to my heart. Maybe someone can help.I am keen to do a PhD (I have a Masters in Business Science and a Masters in Statistics). Preferrably in mathematics of financial engineering.The questions are:- what are the faster PhD/doctorate courses out there?- are there any programs that are done by coursework only?- are there any programs that give credit for past degrees?- how do I go about finding a universe of universities - just googling blindly feels wrong.I should mention that money is not an issue as I am an old f*rt and do it more out of interest than anything else.Cheers,AlkHow old are you Alk?
 
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Alkmene
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PhD - questions

February 6th, 2008, 1:48 am

I agree with the notion that a PhD should involve mainly and primarely, if not exclusively, research.However, I posed the question out of interest. Since I have encountered MFEs that have not done StochCalculus, I would not be surprised if there are PhDs by coursework.The question regarding the time it takes: Off course one would want to know the lower boundary for such an undertaking as there is no real upper boundary - i.e., there is no time frame but a lower bound (cadlag - kind of ;-)Cryptic26 - I am 35 - beyond good and evil in this industry. It seems like the average age on this board is quite a bit younger judging by the kind of answers people receive - quite unrefined and unreflected. And before people comment on this comment: No, I do not mean this thread in particular.Thanks for the useful answers.Regards,Alk
 
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Maelo
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PhD - questions

February 6th, 2008, 10:53 am

Not quite following you here...If just for fun and knowledge..then why the need for speed it up???M
 
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bogracer
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PhD - questions

February 6th, 2008, 2:15 pm

http://www.ashwooduniversity.net/ashwoo ... .aspPlenty of "PhD by mail" programs out there too, if that's what you want -- lower boundary, equivalent of an MFE who is not familiar with stochastic calculus. Not sure why this boundary is the one of interest. Usually, people wonder about the best programs, most challenging advisors, best "names" to have on a resume etc. when pursuing something of this magnitude.
 
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twofish
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PhD - questions

February 6th, 2008, 3:15 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: AlkmeneHowever, I posed the question out of interest. Since I have encountered MFEs that have not done StochCalculus, I would not be surprised if there are PhDs by coursework.A Ph.D. that contains only coursework wouldn't be a "real" Ph.D. in my opinion. If you have a Ph.D. listed on your CV, it's likely that one of your interviewers will go in depth about your dissertation, and if there is no original research, you are much, much worse off than not having listed it on the resume.QuoteThe question regarding the time it takes: Off course one would want to know the lower boundary for such an undertaking as there is no real upper boundary - i.e., there is no time frame but a lower bound (cadlag - kind of ;-)There is an upper boundary of about eight to ten years. The lower boundary is something like two years. The trouble is that how long your dissertation goes depends on luck, and factors outside of your control. You don't know what you are going to find, and therefore its hard to know how long it will take to find it.
 
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cryptic26
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PhD - questions

February 6th, 2008, 8:53 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: AlkmeneI agree with the notion that a PhD should involve mainly and primarely, if not exclusively, research.However, I posed the question out of interest. Since I have encountered MFEs that have not done StochCalculus, I would not be surprised if there are PhDs by coursework.The question regarding the time it takes: Off course one would want to know the lower boundary for such an undertaking as there is no real upper boundary - i.e., there is no time frame but a lower bound (cadlag - kind of ;-)Cryptic26 - I am 35 - beyond good and evil in this industry. It seems like the average age on this board is quite a bit younger judging by the kind of answers people receive - quite unrefined and unreflected. And before people comment on this comment: No, I do not mean this thread in particular.Thanks for the useful answers.Regards,Alk35 is not an old age at all. I know people who have gone back to school at around that age or even at 37. There are also some faculty like Geltner (who is at MIT now) who completed his Phd when he was around 40. But it looks like you need something else from Phd program - more for learning and fun. If you already have Masters in the field that you want to do a Phd, then it might take you less time (not necessarily but possible). If not, then y ou can start by doing part time course work in MA (say) in Mathematics, Statistics, etc. And later apply to get the courses transferrred towards the Phd program. This way you might save 2 out of 5 odd years. In any event you could take courses , whether or not you are in a Phd program and still have a job. You might have a better idea after 2-3 years as to what you would like to do in the future.
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