SERVING THE QUANTITATIVE FINANCE COMMUNITY

 
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MaxCohen
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August 18th, 2009, 7:15 am

The only part-time MSc in comp science I can find in london is at Birkbeck.Are there any other comp science related MSc's that can be recommended. I wouldn't mind something that is mixed with some statistics or maths. Something that would open doors in either general quant developer work, or algorithmic trading.Otherwise there is an online coursehttp://scpd.stanford.edu/public/category/courseCategoryCertificateProfile.do?method=load&certificateId=1240861#searchResultsbut i think this works out at about $50k which is a lot of money for a computer science MSc comparing cost to the like of the full-time courses at KCL.Cheers, Sam.
 
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Cuchulainn
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August 18th, 2009, 9:40 am

What about Open University? It has been around for a while and has a good reputation it would seem.http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgradua ... ndex.htmIn the old days you could wake up at 4.0 am to watch one of their programs on BBC2! Now it's probably internet-based.
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tradgam
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August 18th, 2009, 11:11 am

If you want anything to do with quant work do a pure quant course! Either quant finance like the CQF or UCL's machine learning course if you want to get into algorithmic learning (they used to do it part-time i think). You should be able to pick up any of the 'IT' aspects on the job as banks/hedgies never use software development methodologies etc!!
 
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Cuchulainn
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August 18th, 2009, 11:19 am

QuoteYou should be able to pick up any of the 'IT' aspects on the job
Last edited by Cuchulainn on August 17th, 2009, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
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MaxCohen
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August 18th, 2009, 11:25 am

tradgam,The UCL courses are interesting but all are full-time.Cheers, Sam
 
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ACD
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August 18th, 2009, 11:42 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnWhat about Open University? It has been around for a while and has a good reputation it would seem.http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgradua ... ndex.htmIn the old days you could wake up at 4.0 am to watch one of their programs on BBC2! Now it's probably internet-based.OU will knock you back about £3,000 for an MSc., and I can confirm it's all web based these days as I'm finishing a Maths MSc. through them. Very well organised online IMO.
 
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Cuchulainn
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August 18th, 2009, 11:58 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: ACDQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnWhat about Open University? It has been around for a while and has a good reputation it would seem.http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgradua ... ndex.htmIn the old days you could wake up at 4.0 am to watch one of their programs on BBC2! Now it's probably internet-based.OU will knock you back about £3,000 for an MSc., and I can confirm it's all web based these days as I'm finishing a Maths MSc. through them. Very well organised online IMO.Good course, good price.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
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MaxCohen
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August 24th, 2009, 9:37 am

I already have a MSc in financial maths from Cass, and done the CQF. My C++ skills are not that great yet. Thinking it not realsitic to head in the direction of pure quant roles, unless you have Phd etc.But perhaps quant developer are attainable, if I were to get an MSc in comp science. As the employer will know I have a good level of C++ at least from sitting the part-time MSc at birkbeck. I have read much that comp sceince degrees are that well respected in the city. But combined with my already quantiatative background, and move to qunat developer roles perhaps this is not a problem and a MSc in comp science from birkbeck/OU will serve me well?
 
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endian675
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August 26th, 2009, 12:48 pm

I think you should just get stuck in and get a job. Personally I don't take a great view of people who take degree after degree, without actually getting a job and proving they can do it.
 
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MaxCohen
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August 26th, 2009, 12:56 pm

endian675,I have a job already, hence I took the CQF to refresh my financial math knowledge as it let me do this part-time whilst I work. More just trying too think how I can diversify my skillset on my CV. Looking at all the MSc's in Comp science related disciplines there is probably too much pure I.T. work envolved.Cheers, sam.
 
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twofish
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August 26th, 2009, 1:21 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: samkhalilianBut perhaps quant developer are attainable, if I were to get an MSc in comp science. As the employer will know I have a good level of C++ at least from sitting the part-time MSc at birkbeck.Unless Birkbeck has some UK reputation that I'm unaware of, then this may not be the case. Having a MSc in computer science tells you very little about how good your C++ is. If you really want to improve your C++, find some open source project out there, and start coding.
 
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Cuchulainn
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August 26th, 2009, 1:31 pm

CS people tend - in general - to use languages such as Java, Haskell etc. Human nature being as it is. C++ tends to be more popular in other departments.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on August 25th, 2009, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
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MaxCohen
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MSc Computer Science

August 26th, 2009, 1:31 pm

twofish,I did have also the idea of trying to make a contribution to some open source project as you mentioned. But never done this before, so not sure how I go about doing this.Any examples would be of help. I know/think boost is open source. But how to actually go about making a contribution?Given I am a novice C++ programmer, what if your contribution is sh*t! Your work is simply rejected, therefore it is tested by others?Cheers, Sam.
 
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hardrock
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September 4th, 2009, 2:10 pm

You could try MSc in Computing for Industry: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/computing/te ... ate/indmsc from Imperial, a bit costly though...
 
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twofish
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September 4th, 2009, 6:26 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: samkhalilianI did have also the idea of trying to make a contribution to some open source project as you mentioned. But never done this before, so not sure how I go about doing this.Download the package, make some changes, talk to people on the mailing list for the package. Also you'll quickly find that some people and places are open and some people places aren't/QuoteGiven I am a novice C++ programmer, what if your contribution is sh*t! Your work is simply rejected, therefore it is tested by others?Then you work with the mailing list to improve the work until you get it into the source repository. This involves some political skills, and it also involves trying to figure out for yourself what projects would be useful. You'll usually find that there are a huge amount of open bugs, and simply fixing some bugs will get you a lot of useful experience. You'll find yourself frustrated at times at the difficulties in installing programs, the difficulties of dealing with non-existent or outdated documentation, the difficulties in testing, and you'll find most of your time spend on bug fixing rather than on any new functionality. There is also the political aspect of software development. There are also things about version control, release schedules, software risk management, etc. etc.The error is to see all of those things as distractions from "real work" but the reason that participating in an open source project is that those things I mentioned *are* the real work.
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