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albertmills
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Posts: 380
Joined: March 13th, 2007, 1:09 pm

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August 11th, 2011, 6:50 pm

you get a job offer. you try to negotiate salary, potential employer refuses . the potential employer says there will be a salary review 3 months after you start. you ask that given satisfactory performance could you expect a raise after 3 months and what could you expect it to be. you don't hear back. was the 'what's the raise going to be' question offensive?
 
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sdlife
Posts: 134
Joined: August 28th, 2010, 7:21 am

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August 11th, 2011, 7:07 pm

It seems like it was as you did not hear back, although you haven't specified how long you have waited? Personally I would say yes, it was the wrong question to ask (not that I know much about the interview-offering-hiring process). Its kind of like them asking, "why do you want this job" and you say "for the money", its not really what anyone hiring someone would want to hear.my 2 cents...
 
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nyasha
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Joined: November 29th, 2005, 10:49 pm

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August 15th, 2011, 6:05 pm

I think you were just unlucky. It was a totally legitimate question and you shouldn't have lost out because of it. The factors at play were probably outside of your control - perhaps there was a candidate you'd just beaten to get the role, who was cheaper and more desperate. Or it could be down to negotiating far away from the money (with HR/recruiter), or fixed budget limitations, or maybe even political issues about not wanting to pay more than x and y in similar roles. Don't worry about it. But to boost your level of control next time round, I'd recommend getting a good book on salary negotiations. Fundamentally though, they clearly didn't see the role to be as valuable as you thought, which means it was a mismatch for you anyway. Better luck next time.
 
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rmax
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Joined: December 8th, 2005, 9:31 am

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August 16th, 2011, 7:10 am

Agree with nyasha. Why do you think after 3 months you will be worth more than what they brought you in at? Normally in such cases you DON'T get a payrise after 3 months unless something exceptional happens (everyone in the desk leaves, you make the firm a ton of money, you have comprimising pictures).If I was hiring, (and there were other potential candidates on the market) - why would I hire someone who thought they were undervalued when I brough them in. Likely as not they will leave in 6M - 12M. Not worth it.
 
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DominicConnor
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Joined: July 14th, 2002, 3:00 am

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August 19th, 2011, 1:17 pm

From the information you give, I find that I must respectfully disagree with nyasha, I suspect you were lucky...I detect strong currents of what we headhunters call "being an arsehole", a bad characteristic to find in an employer, perhaps with a helping of being dumb, which may be worse.I nearly disagree with Rmax, since your market value usually drops 3 moths after starting a job.Why ?Because leaving is tricky, and therefore the equilibrium between the foce of money keeping you there relative to you being sucked out goes down. Few employers would cut your pay of course, but their incentive to pay you more is pretty low.Three months however fits those firms who review base pay as part of the annual bonus cycle, so if you miss that, it's >= 15 months until your next rise.
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