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Cuchulainn
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Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
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From quant developer to tech company

May 29th, 2013, 3:01 pm

I have seen that having a degree in CS, maths or anything else (with the possible exception of EE) is neither necessary nor sufficient in order to be a good programmer.
 
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ArthurDent
Posts: 1166
Joined: July 2nd, 2005, 4:38 pm

From quant developer to tech company

May 29th, 2013, 9:50 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnI have seen that having a degree in CS, maths or anything else (with the possible exception of EE) is neither necessary nor sufficient in order to be a good programmer.Yes, but the degree has signalling value in getting hired as one.
 
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capafan2
Posts: 924
Joined: June 20th, 2009, 11:26 am

From quant developer to tech company

May 29th, 2013, 10:59 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: ArthurDentQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnI have seen that having a degree in CS, maths or anything else (with the possible exception of EE) is neither necessary nor sufficient in order to be a good programmer.Yes, but the degree has signalling value in getting hired as one.Perhaps- 10 years back most good programmers did not necessarily have a CS degrees. But there were many to choose from. Wonder where/why the supply dried up. I check out the linkedin profiles of people who develop software for LinkedIn, Facebook's of the world and I see profiles that I simply do not see easily in places outside of NYC or San Francisco. I have known teams in Winsconsin 10 years ago and there had a good mix of solid programmers. Somehow the supply dried up. A lot of good programmers I know do not want to work in the field anymore. Most are content becoming paper pushers but will not allow themselves to be seen as someone with the skill to program. Yet they want to be respected as solid technical guys. I agree with the signaling value in a way. But for the most part CS degrees have become a way to get a visa to enter the USA and then once you get a job try as much as possible to run away from it. Which means CS might signal skills but by no means signals willingness and desire which are a huge component of being a good programmer.
 
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lexington
Posts: 321
Joined: November 16th, 2008, 5:04 am

From quant developer to tech company

May 30th, 2013, 10:35 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: ymousAny practical tips? Should I work with a HH? Just apply directly? Thanks.Silicon Valley vs. Wall Street in talent war
 
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qqqqq
Posts: 63
Joined: September 10th, 2010, 1:58 pm

From quant developer to tech company

May 30th, 2013, 9:35 pm

It is entirely possible, but you will need to brush up your CS, especially algorithms and data structure. This is what interviews at major software companies are about. Companies like Google or Facebook never ask for Hadoop certificate or any other certificate, they are just looking for very smart people who also happen to be good programmers. There are plenty of Math and Physics PhDs working there. You don't need a CS degree. There is a good book "Cracking the coding interview" which you absolutely should buy in case you follow this path.Your motivation is not entirely clear though. If you just want to move from NYC, you can find a finance job elsewhere. On the other hand, there are plenty of jobs at major tech companies in NYC. You might find it easier to get a job locally. Major tech firms also don't use external headhunters.
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