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showmustgoon
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Joined: June 4th, 2014, 1:58 pm

MOOC statement on a resume

June 11th, 2014, 3:27 pm

As the title says, I just got a statement from the Columbia Financial engineering MOOC and I wonder if i can add it on my resume, or maybe it's ridiculous?Thanks everyone
 
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Hansi
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Joined: January 25th, 2010, 11:47 am

MOOC statement on a resume

June 11th, 2014, 3:33 pm

I think in our group we'd view it negatively if listed under education but if mentioned as part of self studying in say a cover letter it would be okay.
Last edited by Hansi on June 11th, 2014, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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showmustgoon
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Joined: June 4th, 2014, 1:58 pm

MOOC statement on a resume

June 12th, 2014, 6:21 am

indeed, in the activities part it would be great I guess!Thanks
 
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DevonFangs
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Joined: November 9th, 2009, 1:49 pm

MOOC statement on a resume

June 12th, 2014, 12:33 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: showmustgoonAs the title says, I just got a statement from the Columbia Financial engineering MOOC and I wonder if i can add it on my resume, or maybe it's ridiculous?Thanks everyoneIs that like coursera? Could go under "others" section, but depends on your experience (which I suspect is close to zero)
 
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DominicConnor
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Joined: July 14th, 2002, 3:00 am

MOOC statement on a resume

June 13th, 2014, 8:39 am

MOOCs are an interesting grey area and Hansi enumerates part of why and in this post don't expect clear answers...Ultimately a PDE doesn't care how you learned to solve it, I first had mean reversion explained to me in a bar and I'd guess by volume, something like 85% of what I have needed to do when I worked in banks was self taught.Of course that is "by volume", measure it by importance and it's much less self taught, maybe 20 ?The point about discovering mean reversion in a bar was that some good % of what you learn on a course is talking to other students and tuition from lecturers, basically you are debugged by these extra processes. That is missing from MOOCs, enough that I predict the formation of a market for people who tutor those who need bits of MOOCs expanded or explained.A problem with MOOCs is that they are open...A good % of your value from a highly branded institution is that you got into there at all.The value added by universities by teaching is not 100% correlated with the brand, always when I write this sort of thing I think of the LSE.Yet it would appear that Hansi would prefer an LSE alumnus over a MOOC.Is he irrational ?Probably not.When he interviews, he can only sample your skills and cannot hope to spot every defect or every bit of brilliance. Thus having a proxy of a branded university admit you and say you are competent in something reduces his risk of hiring a dud and offers a quick way of reducing the set of people he has to interview.Is he wrong to assign a negative weighting ?Yes.Passing a MOOC or any other non-traditional study requires effort, commitment and self discipline. I will share that not everyone who wants to be a quant in a bank has enough of these and it is stupidly hard to check that in an interview, so even before we look at skills gained, we have a plus point for personal attributes.Will you learn as much on a MOOC as an MFE ?Probably not, though MOOCs are getting better and some MFEs aren't.But you will have learned something, Quants are knowledge workers, more is better.So what to do with MOOCs on your CV ?Firstly find out where Hansi works and don't put it on a CV sent there Actually that's the sort of lie you expect from a HH like me.Hansi has a clear position, but others in his firm will have a different one and across the industry you will find a wide spectrum.One principle in interviewing is to exceed expectations, so if you don't mention the MOOC, but display knowledge that is beyond what they'd expect of you otherwise, you will gain momentum in their decision to take you further. That argues for leaving it out.A middle case is to stick the MOOC in "interests and activities", it will help on buzzword search.Lastly there is a special case of where a MOOC is a very good thing...Some people reading this will be between jobs, when they go for interview they can expect to be asked "what have you been doing since..."I'd say a MOOC is a very good answer, certainly better than the impression given by some that they've become wise in the ways of Judge Judy and reruns of 80s sitcoms.
 
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chocolatemoney
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Joined: October 8th, 2008, 6:50 am

MOOC statement on a resume

July 10th, 2014, 10:00 am

I see that collecting MOOC certificates is now a hot trend. I have seen LNKD profiles with over 10 mooc certificates cerefully listed. This may not apply to every mooc but in general I think it is a pity because that time could have been better spent on other stuff, f.ex. open-source projects: would you like to learn, say, python? get your hands dirty and code something useful for the community.
 
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DominicConnor
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Joined: July 14th, 2002, 3:00 am

MOOC statement on a resume

August 11th, 2014, 1:16 pm

An interesting thing about the demographics is that overwhelmingly MOOCs are taken by white male university greads.
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