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Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 8:24 pm
by Cuchulainn
 I hope he's not doing it on NASA' s time.

Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 8:35 pm
by Collector
 I hope he's not doing it on NASA' s time.
second best to going to the dark side of the moon must be star shade what about option Geek-Greeks origami ?

Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 8:59 pm
by Cuchulainn
Those CAD orgamis evolve into CAM sheet metal.
Image

Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 9:21 pm
by Paul
Are we all agreed the answer is e? (pi wasn’t an option.)

Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 9:52 pm
by Collector
yes e and the more general solution \(e^5\)

Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 9:53 pm
by trackstar
Are we all agreed the answer is e? (pi wasn’t an option.)
Alright.  And ordered some books too.  

Robert Harbin - author page on Amazon

Robert J. Lang - author page on Amazon

Such - RL is the NASA engineer in one of the previous videos and not only has he developed relevant folding designs for space craft materiel, he left NASA in the early 2000s to see if he could make a living doing origami. Wonderful entrepreneurial streak there. 

And here from my art supply box - origami paper from Kyoto circa 1997.
origamipaper.JPG
Probably all of us know how to make cranes and small inflatable boxes, but there is so much more...!

Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 9:57 pm
by Cuchulainn
yes e and the more general solution \(e^5\)
Brilliant induction step.

Re: Optimal solution please

Posted: February 5th, 2019, 9:59 pm
by neauveq
Are we all agreed the answer is e? (pi wasn’t an option.)
It made sense to me. In each of the columns the middle square represents the union of both the upper and lower squares of that column less the common elements they share. For the unknown square, look at the first square in that column and look for any of its elements that do not appear in the middle square. These will be the common elements of both the first square and the unknown third square. Second, look for any elements in the middle square that do not appear in the first square. These will be the unique elements of the third square. Add the first and second sets together and you get the square represented by option e.