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Traden4Alpha
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Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

Where do you end up if you do the opposite of what your navigator tells you to do?

October 3rd, 2015, 10:58 pm

Fun problem! A few requirements.....1. No dead-end streets (traps the driver)2. No one-way streets (forces the driver to follow the instructions)3. A spherically symmetric network and set of destination (every address has an antipodal address)4. No N-way intersections with N>3 (creates ambiguity: instructions say "straight" but "right" and "left" are possible)(note: if one has already taken 1 or more opposite directions, then "reverse" is actually a route back to the avoided destination and must never be taken)Note: there's more constraints if one wants to ensure that the point of indifference (where the GPS instructions flip from telling you to go back to telling you to go forward) is antipodal and unique.
Last edited by Traden4Alpha on October 3rd, 2015, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Traden4Alpha
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Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

Where do you end up if you do the opposite of what your navigator tells you to do?

October 3rd, 2015, 11:05 pm

P.S. The answer to your unintended question is "sometimes dead". About once or twice a year in the U.S. someone follows their GPS navigator instructions onto a shortcut through impassible mountain or desert roads with tragic results.
 
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Traden4Alpha
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Where do you end up if you do the opposite of what your navigator tells you to do?

October 5th, 2015, 11:40 am

Good mod to rule 4 and interesting issue with D-to-B vs. D*-to-BThe hypercube issue illustrates another restriction:5. No loops that don't include great circle loops.Driving in Iceland, one would soon come to the point on the main loop road highway where forward and backward are equidistant to the avoided destination and one is still quite far from the antipode of the destination.If the destination happens to be a hub in the road network, then the antipodal point of the hub may not be reachable without going through the hub. This is a generalization of the dead-end rule in which one starts in a dead-end branch or dead-end tree of the graph and both the destination and the antipode of the destination requiring driving out of that dead-end. So, "NO TREES" in the road network topology is a generalization of requirement #1.P.S. We forgot rule #0: total connectivity: every starting point is connected to every destinatiion and it's antipode. (no oceans)
 
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Cuchulainn
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Where do you end up if you do the opposite of what your navigator tells you to do?

November 6th, 2015, 1:38 pm

Tom Tom doesn't work in Italy..
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl

Every Time We Teach a Child Something, We Keep Him from Inventing It Himself
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Traden4Alpha
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Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

Where do you end up if you do the opposite of what your navigator tells you to do?

November 6th, 2015, 1:49 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnTom Tom doesn't work in Italy..Perhaps doing the opposite of Tom Tom (Mot Mot) would help.
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