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zerdna
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State of Russian Math./Science

January 9th, 2014, 3:58 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: GamalQuoteOriginally posted by: zerdna"only zi French understand mats and the universe and let me feed you a hundred pages of general theory of everything before i say anything related to the matter"OK, let's return to our sheep, in this case called "State of Russian Math/Science." For some time period I used to work with Russian physisists from the Landau Institute and they were model representatives of "only zi Russian physists understand mats and the universe..." point of view.Sure, but that's true in the case of Russian physicists, no ? Actually, I looked up Bruno's details -- his undergrad in Math and PhD in numerical analysis are from a Brazilian university. His Masters in Artificial Intelligence, whatever that means, is from a university from Paris, but this being not Ecole is probably a relatively benign place that doesn't rob you from common sense completely.
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Gamal
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January 9th, 2014, 6:26 pm

Zerdna, my PhD is from Ecole Polytechnique under Nicole and I consider myself quite normal. There's no determinism
 
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zerdna
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State of Russian Math./Science

January 9th, 2014, 7:19 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: GamalZerdna, my PhD is from Ecole Polytechnique under Nicole and I consider myself quite normal. There's no determinism You are in high demand then. There is no determinism, indeed. My empirical observation was that going to Ecole while not being French native and not pure math grad tends not to screw you up that much. Guys i know from Lebanon or Morocco who have engineering degrees, managed to preserve their sense of humor.
 
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Cuchulainn
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January 9th, 2014, 8:16 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: zerdnaQuoteOriginally posted by: GamalZerdna, my PhD is from Ecole Polytechnique under Nicole and I consider myself quite normal. There's no determinism You are in high demand then. There is no determinism, indeed. My empirical observation was that going to Ecole while not being French native and not pure math grad tends not to screw you up that much. Guys i know from Lebanon or Morocco who have engineering degrees, managed to preserve their sense of humor.You obviously missed the beautiful French mathematicians from Pierre et Madame Curie and INRIA. BTW the JL Lions institute and INRIA is very strong in numerical analysis.
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Cuchulainn
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January 10th, 2014, 10:05 am

Mathematics is not a science IMO, but it is historically a part of Philosophy. My undergrad degree was B.A. (Mod).Many of the discussions here are less about specific contents (it's al maths) and more about style, e.g. Arnold's mechanistic style versus Bourbaki.
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Paul
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January 10th, 2014, 11:39 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnMathematics is not a science IMO, but it is historically a part of Philosophy.Yes. And it's not easy to be a mathematician unless you did maths as an undergrad degree, and in your youth.P
 
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daveangel
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January 10th, 2014, 12:09 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: PaulQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnMathematics is not a science IMO, but it is historically a part of Philosophy.Yes. And it's not easy to be a mathematician unless you did maths as an undergrad degree, and in your youth.PGauss was a mathematician before he went to University.
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Cuchulainn
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January 10th, 2014, 12:12 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: PaulQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnMathematics is not a science IMO, but it is historically a part of Philosophy.Yes. And it's not easy to be a mathematician unless you did maths as an undergrad degree, and in your youth.PAbsolutey.They say that one is best (original) at 24/25, then it is downhill after that.It is mind-boggling doing a MSc/MFE and not having this mathematical background, e.g. measure theory ... I did group theory at school when 17 (using Arnold analogy of geometric transformation, not Bourbaki); my teacher has a PhD from Uni London in number theory) but learing this stuff when in one's 30's ++ is painful. The brain cells just can't handle the abstraction, anymore. It is possible to do Fourier series and Laplace transforms well into your 60's.
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Cuchulainn
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January 10th, 2014, 1:10 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: daveangelQuoteOriginally posted by: PaulQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnMathematics is not a science IMO, but it is historically a part of Philosophy.Yes. And it's not easy to be a mathematician unless you did maths as an undergrad degree, and in your youth.PGauss was a mathematician before he went to University."Youth is wasted on the young."
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albertmills
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January 10th, 2014, 3:58 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: PaulQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnMathematics is not a science IMO, but it is historically a part of Philosophy.Yes. And it's not easy to be a mathematician unless you did maths as an undergrad degree, and in your youth.PAbsolutey.They say that one is best (original) at 24/25, then it is downhill after that.It is mind-boggling doing a MSc/MFE and not having this mathematical background, e.g. measure theory ... I did group theory at school when 17 (using Arnold analogy of geometric transformation, not Bourbaki); my teacher has a PhD from Uni London in number theory) but learing this stuff when in one's 30's ++ is painful. The brain cells just can't handle the abstraction, anymore. It is possible to do Fourier series and Laplace transforms well into your 60's.years ago i got into a good MFE program. I was preparing myself for the program by reading the recommended book on stochastic calculus by shreve (including measure theory) in finance...it was very rough going for someone who had a technical background, but had never seen that kind of math before, and was working a full time job. I did well in my math classes at school, but they had hadn't covered this.
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ThinkDifferent
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January 11th, 2014, 8:57 am

Not really about Russia, but this dedushka from Kazakhstan just published what he claims to be a solution to the Navier-Stokes problem (the paper is available only in russian yet).http://bnews.kz/en/news/post/180213/ http://www.math.kz/images/journal/2013- ... 2_2013.pdf
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Cuchulainn
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January 13th, 2014, 4:33 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: albertmillsQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: PaulQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnMathematics is not a science IMO, but it is historically a part of Philosophy.Yes. And it's not easy to be a mathematician unless you did maths as an undergrad degree, and in your youth.PAbsolutey.They say that one is best (original) at 24/25, then it is downhill after that.It is mind-boggling doing a MSc/MFE and not having this mathematical background, e.g. measure theory ... I did group theory at school when 17 (using Arnold analogy of geometric transformation, not Bourbaki); my teacher has a PhD from Uni London in number theory) but learing this stuff when in one's 30's ++ is painful. The brain cells just can't handle the abstraction, anymore. It is possible to do Fourier series and Laplace transforms well into your 60's.years ago i got into a good MFE program. I was preparing myself for the program by reading the recommended book on stochastic calculus by shreve (including measure theory) in finance...it was very rough going for someone who had a technical background, but had never seen that kind of math before, and was working a full time job. I did well in my math classes at school, but they had hadn't covered this.You are not the first person to have aired such views on this topic. If we take the SDE as the middle ground to understand initially then the prerequisites IMO are nothing less than measure, Lebesgue, (functional) analysis and probability, even some PDE otherwise the symbols mean nothing. Having got to SDE, then the applicatons get discussed but much of the theory tends to be devoid of hands-on examples. Not having numerical methods and computational approach certainly does not help. At the end of the day it's about number-crunching I suppose.I am not in academia, but is seems to me that the cart is being put before the horse. It's cruel. And kind of ad-hoc. //Even, how do you compute a Lebesque integral approximately, similar to Riemann.
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Gamal
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January 13th, 2014, 8:17 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: ThinkDifferentNot really about Russia, but this dedushka from Kazakhstan just published what he claims to be a solution to the Navier-Stokes problem (the paper is available only in russian yet).http://bnews.kz/en/news/post/180213/ http://www.math.kz/images/journal/2013- ... 3.pdfLooks serious and not oversophisticated.
 
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Cuchulainn
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January 13th, 2014, 9:16 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: GamalQuoteOriginally posted by: ThinkDifferentNot really about Russia, but this dedushka from Kazakhstan just published what he claims to be a solution to the Navier-Stokes problem (the paper is available only in russian yet).http://bnews.kz/en/news/post/180213/ http://www.math.kz/images/journal/2013- ... 3.pdfLooks serious and not oversophisticated.Is the solution computable?
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Gamal
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January 13th, 2014, 10:08 am

Seems so, it's all Leray/Temam/Vishik formalism of various Hilbert spaces. Hilbert spaces are nicely tractable via eigenvalue expansion.Numerical problems aren't a major issues for N-S, we know which problems are stable and which not, the difficulty is in pure maths.
Last edited by Gamal on January 12th, 2014, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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