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jasonbell
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

March 19th, 2024, 12:57 pm

Is deep learning defunct as an idea?
No one talks about it anymore. Problem is that no one really talks about the "how" on any of this stuff much, just the stochastic parrot than randomly churns out output. 
Twitter: @jasonbelldata
Author of Machine Learning: Hands on for Developers and Technical Professionals (Wiley).
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

March 20th, 2024, 10:32 am

Is deep learning defunct as an idea?
No one talks about it anymore. Problem is that no one really talks about the "how" on any of this stuff much, just the stochastic parrot than randomly churns out output. 
A few years ago here was DL all the rage

viewtopic.php?t=100978

Have people learned from these hallucinations? One issue is CS thinking maths is easy. Marketing chicanery.
And the "maths" underlying SGD is a yuge embarassment. It is not even wrong.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

March 20th, 2024, 11:10 am

The "good" news I suppose is that bloggers don't post those dinky neural networks (as often) like they used to.
 
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jasonbell
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

March 20th, 2024, 12:08 pm

Is deep learning defunct as an idea?
No one talks about it anymore. Problem is that no one really talks about the "how" on any of this stuff much, just the stochastic parrot than randomly churns out output. 
A few years ago here was DL all the rage

viewtopic.php?t=100978

Have people learned from these hallucinations? One issue is CS thinking maths is easy. Marketing chicanery.
And the "maths" underlying SGD is a yuge embarassment. It is not even wrong.
There'll always be another "thing", it's the ebb/flow of marketing software products. It's been years since I've done any math in CS (I never did a degree in CS, I'm self taught). Languages will come and go, frameworks will come and go. Now Jensen is saying all coders will be gone in n number of years (they won't). It's just words.....

I'm having more fun with learning the math side now than I ever did learning anything in the tech scene, it actually feels more honest and provable. 

As for the dinky neural nets, I used to do a talk about replacing Darcey Bussell on Strictly with linear regression, a basic J48 decision tree and a neural network. Then I got the audience to place a bet on the model with the best prediction..... oh boy did I upset the suits who were pushing neural nets without knowing how they worked :) 
Twitter: @jasonbelldata
Author of Machine Learning: Hands on for Developers and Technical Professionals (Wiley).
 
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Cuchulainn
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Re: FIVE hundred years from now: can you predict the Software Landscape in anno 2525?

April 3rd, 2024, 7:17 am

Image
> "Whether written using a fountain pen or typewriter, Dijkstra’s technical reports were composed at a speed of around three words per minute. “The rest of the time,” he remarked, “is taken up by thinking.”9 For Dijkstra, writing and thinking blended into one activity. When preparing a new EWD, he always sought to produce the final version from the outset."

> "He also never purchased a computer. Eventually, in the late 1980s, he was given one as a gift by a computer company, but never used it for word processing. Dijkstra did not own a TV, a VCR, or even a mobile phone. He preferred to avoid the cinema, citing an oversensitivity to visual input. By contrast, he enjoyed attending classical music concerts."