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iggy101
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 11:15 am

Thanks for the advice guys. I'll look in to getting some legal advice. Thanks very much for the offer Dominic but unfortunately I'm based away from London. I didnt realise that there was free legal advice available for this kind of thing?I've never heard of the term "Controlled Person", what is that? The only stuff I can find on google about it seems to be related to terrorism!In regards to anonymity, I'll stop talking about my PhD now. That wasn't the best idea to start that :-P
 
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ppauper
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 1:10 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnTreat someone like a criminal, and they may act as one.or act as a criminal as you have, and be treated like one
 
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Cuchulainn
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 1:22 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnTreat someone like a criminal, and they may act as one.or act as a criminal as you have, and be treated like oneMistakingly sitting in the wrong compartment is not seen as a criminal activity in this part of the world. Especially when you are innocent of the fact. In this case the conductor was abusing his power.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on September 18th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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ppauper
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 1:24 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnTreat someone like a criminal, and they may act as one.or act as a criminal as you have, and be treated like oneMistakingly sitting in the wrong compartment is not seen as a criminal activity in this part of the world. Especially when you are innocent of the fact.breaking the law makes you a criminal ....
 
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Cuchulainn
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September 19th, 2008, 1:36 pm

Civil law or Romano-Germanic law or Continental law is the predominant system of law in the world. Civil law as a legal system is often compared with common law. The main difference that is usually drawn between the two systems is that common law draws abstract rules from specific cases, whereas civil law starts with abstract rules, which judges must then apply to the various cases before them.Civil law has its roots in Roman law, Canon law (Christian, especially Catholic law) and the Enlightenment
 
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Anthis
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September 19th, 2008, 2:11 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnTreat someone like a criminal, and they may act as one.or act as a criminal as you have, and be treated like oneMistakingly sitting in the wrong compartment is not seen as a criminal activity in this part of the world. Especially when you are innocent of the fact.breaking the law makes you a criminal ....I am not sure in what jurisdiction being extorted implies what you broke the law.
 
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ppauper
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 2:19 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: AnthisQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnTreat someone like a criminal, and they may act as one.or act as a criminal as you have, and be treated like oneMistakingly sitting in the wrong compartment is not seen as a criminal activity in this part of the world. Especially when you are innocent of the fact.breaking the law makes you a criminal ....I am not sure in what jurisdiction being extorted implies what you broke the law.interesting point, Anthis.If your point is that you consider that Cuchulainn's punishment for the law he broke was execessive, take it up with the lawmakers in the relevant country.
 
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endian675
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 2:38 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: ppauperQuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnTreat someone like a criminal, and they may act as one.or act as a criminal as you have, and be treated like oneMoron. If/when they implement the TJ blocker, you're going straight on that list as well.
 
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Cuchulainn
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 2:45 pm

The 50 pound on the spot fine was immoral in this case, we had a ticketppauper,They would laugh at you in most EU countries if you said that not paying a tram fare was a criminal act; it is a civil crime.Be careful.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on September 18th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Anthis
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September 19th, 2008, 2:56 pm

In my perception and mentality and i guess in most people's mentality cuch's story is a case of extortion, a bit covered, but still extortion. In this side of the world, if a passenger by accident (and accidents can happen if control is loose, probably due to cost savings, because there are people who may be first time passengers, people with health problems, foreign people who dont speak the local language etc.) is found to be sitting in the wrong seat, will be kindly requested to go to right one or even be directed there, alternatively, subject to vacancies, he may be offered to pay the difference on the spot and stay there. Not a big deal. Its called customer care. Fining your passenger for this "accident", especially if the fine exceeds the price difference by a big multiple, sounds like an extortion or operator's ambush to make money on other people's (operator's customers) mistakes. And when you carry thousands or millions of passengers daily, its almost certain that such "accidents" will happen on a daily basis. Or let me reverse the situation a bit. If cuch traveled with a b class ticket sitting on a c class seat, would he be entitled to fine the operator for this accident? Or would the operator compensate cuch promptly and wholeheartedly on the spot once the "accident" was discovered? I dont think so...
 
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Cuchulainn
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September 19th, 2008, 5:55 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: AnthisIn my perception and mentality and i guess in most people's mentality cuch's story is a case of extortion, a bit covered, but still extortion. In this side of the world, if a passenger by accident (and accidents can happen if control is loose, probably due to cost savings, because there are people who may be first time passengers, people with health problems, foreign people who dont speak the local language etc.) is found to be sitting in the wrong seat, will be kindly requested to go to right one or even be directed there, alternatively, subject to vacancies, he may be offered to pay the difference on the spot and stay there. Not a big deal. Its called customer care. Fining your passenger for this "accident", especially if the fine exceeds the price difference by a big multiple, sounds like an extortion or operator's ambush to make money on other people's (operator's customers) mistakes. And when you carry thousands or millions of passengers daily, its almost certain that such "accidents" will happen on a daily basis. Or let me reverse the situation a bit. If cuch traveled with a b class ticket sitting on a c class seat, would he be entitled to fine the operator for this accident? Or would the operator compensate cuch promptly and wholeheartedly on the spot once the "accident" was discovered? I dont think so... here's one story based on a random google search...here I purchased tickets for a return journey from Newcastle to London online and arranged to pick them up at the fast ticket machine, however I got to the station very late and in a rush I picked up 4 out of 5 coupons. The ticket and reservation are printed on separate coupons and I only picked up the reservation coupon for the outward journey.I was promptly fined £124.50 plus £10 admin fee.I wrote a letter explaining that it was a genuine mistake and provided evidence i.e the internet booking receipt for the train journey as well as several other receipts for journeys that I had taken and had never been fined showing that I was a good customer and this was clearly just a simple mistake.They wrote back offering to reduce the fine to £98.30.I wrote another appeals letter showing that my income is only around £35/week that there was no way I could pay the fine and asked if they would reconsider.The next letter I received today says that after seeking legal advice I must pay the fine or have to pay the original fine of £134.50 plus another £20 admin plus £250 legal costs and are nice enough to let me pay £5/month.Do I have a chance if they take me to court, all these details are 100% correct.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on September 18th, 2008, 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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foias
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 10:51 pm

Yes, potential employers of quants do care about a criminal record, for at least two reasons. One is that the regulators are going to ask about it if they register you. The other is that the most important thing they need most from quants, even above competence, is honesty. If you make a mistake that causes your employer to do an unfavourable trade that will cost it some money. If you realise your mistake but choose to cover it up that could cost it a lot of money.
 
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TraderJoe
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 10:58 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: foiasYes, potential employers of quants do care about a criminal record, for at least two reasons. One is that the regulators are going to ask about it if they register you. The other is that the most important thing they need most from quants, even above competence, is honesty. If you make a mistake that causes your employer to do an unfavourable trade that will cost it some money. If you realise your mistake but choose to cover it up that could cost it a lot of money.What, like about $5trillion? Ahahahahahahahahahahaha ........ !
 
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Paul
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 19th, 2008, 11:39 pm

A few years ago, when the UK was a sensible country, a fine/record for not buying a ticket would have meant something. (Economists might say it was a 'signal.') With the way the country is being run now it is just a matter of time before we all have criminal records for littering, smoking, loitering, wearing garments with hoods, defending oneself against assault, speaking to a policeman with your hands in your pockets, thinking about littering or smoking or loitering or... So it cannot matter anymore, there is no signal when we are all criminals.I agree with Dominic that a lawyer should be contacted asap. Because while our government is taking away all the civil liberties from the good citizens they are at the same time giving the baddies all sorts of bizarre rights. So there is bound to be some human rights legislation which says they can't ask you to divulge any information about yourself whatsoever in case it prejudices your chances of employment.BTW, for what it's worth, I read recently that mathematicians are the least likely to lie on their CVs.P
 
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ppauper
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Entry-level quant job prospects with "criminal" record

September 20th, 2008, 1:03 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: migalleyQuoteThis represents an excellent opportunity for networking!I propose you go to jail, where you'll be sure to make many excellent contacts among those most ambitious of corporate ladder climbers -- white collar criminals. In fact with any luck soon the prisons will be better for meeting industry contacts than country clubs.If that fails, iggy101 might have to network with the man-rapist sharing his cell. Yuk!prison sounds a lot like NZ
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