SERVING THE QUANTITATIVE FINANCE COMMUNITY

 
User avatar
ExSan
Topic Author
Posts: 4572
Joined: April 12th, 2003, 10:40 am

Haskell

December 7th, 2013, 12:10 pm

Wikipedia: Haskell _ programming_languageHaskell
Last edited by ExSan on December 6th, 2013, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
Polter
Posts: 2526
Joined: April 29th, 2008, 4:55 pm

Haskell

December 7th, 2013, 1:40 pm

Yeah, Haskell is pretty interesting.Here's a type-safe data-store interface for Haskell, Persistent:http://www.yesodweb.com/book/persistentAutomatic differentiation (AD):http://conal.net/blog/posts/beautiful-d ... es-it-work
 
User avatar
Traden4Alpha
Posts: 23951
Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

Haskell

December 7th, 2013, 2:52 pm

Functional programming == Verb Land?
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 62608
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Haskell

December 7th, 2013, 3:01 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaFunctional programming == Verb Land?Yep. Verbs do things. Nouns are docile. But we can eliminate verbs altogether. "When we talk mathematics, we may be discussing a secondary language built on the primary language of the nervous system."
Last edited by Cuchulainn on December 6th, 2013, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
User avatar
Traden4Alpha
Posts: 23951
Joined: September 20th, 2002, 8:30 pm

Haskell

December 7th, 2013, 4:13 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: CuchulainnQuoteOriginally posted by: Traden4AlphaFunctional programming == Verb Land?Yep. Verbs do things. Nouns are docile. But we can eliminate verbs altogether. "When we talk mathematics, we may be discussing a secondary language built on the primary language of the nervous system."Maybe.Aren't "x" and "K" adjectives on some implicit noun????
 
User avatar
chocolatemoney
Posts: 322
Joined: October 8th, 2008, 6:50 am

Haskell

December 14th, 2013, 9:16 am

Interestingly, I run a little survey (40fin math practitioners) and discovered that functional programming is primarily associated with currying, functions as first class citizens and the use of lambdas - anonymous functions. I was surprised as I expected referential transparency and the use of immutable data structures to top all the above. Basically, you can claim your code is functional without the need of being pure functional.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 62608
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Haskell

December 14th, 2013, 2:55 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: chocolatemoneyInterestingly, I run a little survey (40fin math practitioners) and discovered that functional programming is primarily associated with currying, functions as first class citizens and the use of lambdas - anonymous functions. I was surprised as I expected referential transparency and the use of immutable data structures to top all the above. Basically, you can claim your code is functional without the need of being pure functional.Does it really matter what it's called so long it satisfies the requirements on time and within budget?
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
User avatar
katastrofa
Posts: 9446
Joined: August 16th, 2007, 5:36 am
Location: Alpha Centauri

Haskell

December 15th, 2013, 8:57 am

Exactly. You can call it Susan if it makes you happy.
 
User avatar
katastrofa
Posts: 9446
Joined: August 16th, 2007, 5:36 am
Location: Alpha Centauri

Haskell

December 15th, 2013, 8:58 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: chocolatemoneyInterestingly, I run a little survey (40fin math practitioners) and discovered that functional programming is primarily associated with currying, functions as first class citizens and the use of lambdas - anonymous functions. I was surprised as I expected referential transparency and the use of immutable data structures to top all the above. Basically, you can claim your code is functional without the need of being pure functional.Immutable data structures kind of suck when you want to do efficient numerical computations.
 
User avatar
chocolatemoney
Posts: 322
Joined: October 8th, 2008, 6:50 am

Haskell

December 15th, 2013, 10:22 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: katastrofaQuoteOriginally posted by: chocolatemoneyInterestingly, I run a little survey (40fin math practitioners) and discovered that functional programming is primarily associated with currying, functions as first class citizens and the use of lambdas - anonymous functions. I was surprised as I expected referential transparency and the use of immutable data structures to top all the above. Basically, you can claim your code is functional without the need of being pure functional.Immutable data structures kind of suck when you want to do efficient numerical computations.This is true; this is obvious, you don't want to copy the whole data container at each iteration/chainge. I never suggested to prefer immutables in every circumstance.Furthermore, my post is really not about naming conventions - I thought my little survey was quite fun in illustrating some of the current trends in functional programming, some ongoing debates in the FP area and the stance taken by some players. For example, if I reckon correctly, MSFT suggested in their F# guidelines to prefer global state via OOD to more "Haskellian" state monads, despite providing syntactic sugar for monads via the computational expressions. Furthermore, if currently the key fp features fp practitioners primarily demand are first class citizens and lambdas and purity is only secondary : what is the near term future, in terms of adoption rates, of a pure and lazy fp language as Haskell? You may disagree with this, but I think the Haskell ecosystem is probably less rich than jvm and .net, hence the haskell community must grow in order to catch-up.I am sorry if I may have gone off-topic. Cheers
Last edited by chocolatemoney on December 14th, 2013, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
katastrofa
Posts: 9446
Joined: August 16th, 2007, 5:36 am
Location: Alpha Centauri

Haskell

December 16th, 2013, 9:36 am

I think the big problem is that the FP community is too academic and separated from realities of software development. Take this guy, who's apparently a big fish in functional data structures:http://okasaki.blogspot.co.uk/2008/02/t ... .htmlQuote Second, and more importantly, probably 95+% of uses of functional red-black trees don't need deletions anyway. Because the trees are immutable, when you want to delete something, you can simply revert back to a previous version of the tree from before the unwanted item was inserted. This is almost always both the easiest and the right thing to do. The exception is when you inserted something else that you want to keep after the item to be deleted, but this is extremely rare.I'm not a CS expert by any measure, but even I know that people do delete in R-B trees... He's just making excuses for going the traditional academic route of solving the easy bits, getting the paper out and moving on.
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 62608
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Haskell

December 16th, 2013, 11:00 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: katastrofaI think the big problem is that the FP community is too academic and separated from realities of software development. Take this guy, who's apparently a big fish in functional data structures:http://okasaki.blogspot.co.uk/2008/02/t ... .htmlQuote Second, and more importantly, probably 95+% of uses of functional red-black trees don't need deletions anyway. Because the trees are immutable, when you want to delete something, you can simply revert back to a previous version of the tree from before the unwanted item was inserted. This is almost always both the easiest and the right thing to do. The exception is when you inserted something else that you want to keep after the item to be deleted, but this is extremely rare.I'm not a CS expert by any measure, but even I know that people do delete in R-B trees... He's just making excuses for going the traditional academic route of solving the easy bits, getting the paper out and moving on.It's all a bit too dinky/cute for my liking. What I would like to see is a real application in FP. At the moment FP is a solution looking for a problem. But 20% _is_ useful IMO (See C++ 11 and C# 5.0).
Last edited by Cuchulainn on December 15th, 2013, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
 
User avatar
katastrofa
Posts: 9446
Joined: August 16th, 2007, 5:36 am
Location: Alpha Centauri

Haskell

December 17th, 2013, 11:06 am

FP is more of a design pattern than the universal programming paradigm its fanatics claim it to be.
 
User avatar
chocolatemoney
Posts: 322
Joined: October 8th, 2008, 6:50 am

Haskell

December 17th, 2013, 11:51 am

QuoteOriginally posted by: katastrofaFP is more of a design pattern than the universal programming paradigm its fanatics claim it to be.True: "referential transparency or death"
 
User avatar
Cuchulainn
Posts: 62608
Joined: July 16th, 2004, 7:38 am
Location: Amsterdam
Contact:

Haskell

December 17th, 2013, 12:22 pm

QuoteOriginally posted by: chocolatemoneyQuoteOriginally posted by: katastrofaFP is more of a design pattern than the universal programming paradigm its fanatics claim it to be.True: "referential transparency or death"Single paradigm languages have no future IMO. A follow-on is that it tends to promote <quote>zealous evangelism<unquote> QuoteMy specific complaint is the ?uncritical? part. Being enthusiastic about things is awesome, I think that?s a large part of the difference between a bad programmer and a good programmer. But being uncritical is less desirable. This typically manifests in one of two forms, the more common being an ?us vs them? mentality.
Last edited by Cuchulainn on December 16th, 2013, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Step over the gap, not into it. Watch the space between platform and train.
http://www.datasimfinancial.com
http://www.datasim.nl
ABOUT WILMOTT

PW by JB

Wilmott.com has been "Serving the Quantitative Finance Community" since 2001. Continued...


Twitter LinkedIn Instagram

JOBS BOARD

JOBS BOARD

Looking for a quant job, risk, algo trading,...? Browse jobs here...


GZIP: On